As described in my previous blog post (Nutrition, Gut Microbiota and Behavior, 4th of April), I will investigate the association between nutrition, gut microbiota and behavior. One of the main focuses within my research is to investigate the association between early life nutrition, gut microbiota development and inhibitory control within toddlers and pubertal children.

The first 1000 days of life (starting from conception) were shown to be a critical window for child development. In this phase, nutritional intake of the infant can stimulate the body and brain towards a healthy development, also known as nutritional programming1. Hence, early life nutrition, i.e. breastfeeding, can exert a major influence on infant development and thus future behavior. Breast milk contains many beneficial components such as sugars, immune factors and bacteria which are difficult to process in bottle formulas. Thus, exclusive breastfeeding is recommended until six months of age in the Netherlands.breastfeeding and early nutrition

Several studies have looked at the association between infant breastfeeding duration and future executive functioning. (Executive functions are cognitive processes in the brain that contribute to regulating thoughts and behaviors. Executive functions can be roughly divided into three core functions, namely: inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. Inhibitory control, which can be interpreted as the opposite of impulsivity, is necessary to suppress impulses.) Two studies found positive associations with breastfeeding duration and executive functioning in childhood2,3. However, some studies have found no associations between infant breastfeeding and future executive functioning 4,5. These studies have examined general executive functioning and mainly focussed on attention, and not inhibitory control. Furthermore, different ages and populations were examined which makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the association between breastfeeding duration and future executive functioning. Thus, it is of particular interest whether inhibitory control is association with breastfeeding duration.

In addition, previous literature has focused mostly on duration of breastfeeding, while the composition of breast milk is also of major importance. Breastmilk contains many nutrients that are finely attuned to the needs of the infant. It contains biologically active compounds which have diverse roles, among others guiding the development of the infant’s intestinal microbiota6. Breast milk also contains specific sugars, also known as human oligosaccharides, which have been shown to influence the types of microbiota colonizing in the infant gut7. This may potentially be associated with impulsive behaviour8. Thus, in addition to examining breastfeeding duration in relation to inhibitory control, I will also examine the breastmilk composition in relation to inhibitory control.

  1. Agosti, M., Tandoi, F., Morlacchi, L. & Bossi, A. Nutritional and metabolic programming during the first thousand days of life. La Pediatr. Medica e Chir. 39, (2017).
  2. Hayatbakhsh, M. R., O’Callaghan, M. J., Bor, W., Williams, G. M. & Najman, J. M. Association of Breastfeeding and Adolescents’ Psychopathology: A Large Prospective Study. Breastfeed. Med. 7, 480–486 (2012).
  3. Julvez, J. et al. Attention behaviour and hyperactivity at age 4 and duration of breast-feeding. Acta Paediatr. 96, 842–847 (2007).
  4. Belfort, M. B. et al. Infant Breastfeeding Duration and Mid-Childhood Executive Function, Behavior, and Social-Emotional Development. J. Dev. Behav. Pediatr. 37, 43–52 (2016).
  5. Groen-Blokhuis, M. M. et al. A prospective study of the effects of breastfeeding and FADS2 polymorphisms on cognition and hyperactivity/attention problems. Am. J. Med. Genet. Part B Neuropsychiatr. Genet. 162, 457–465 (2013).
  6. Andreas, N. J., Kampmann, B. & Mehring Le-Doare, K. Human breast milk: A review on its composition and bioactivity. Early Hum. Dev. 91, 629–635 (2015).
  7. Lewis, Z. T. et al. Maternal fucosyltransferase 2 status affects the gut bifidobacterial communities of breastfed infants. Microbiome 3, 13 (2015).