Every time I travel and enter the breakfast room of my hotel, I think of Japan.

And not just because of the curious surprises that I encountered when traveling there. (Once, the hotel’s definition of a ‘western style breakfast buffet’ was shrimp pasta and pepperoni pizza!) The Japanese have an interesting relationship with their nutrition. Japanese cuisine is said to have a much higher dietary diversity than western cultures do.

This is associated with a reduced intellectual decline at older age, as was reported by Rei Otsuka and colleagues in 2017 (among others).  In other words, daily intake of various kinds of food lower the risk that you encounter a reduction of your cognitive abilities as you grow older.

Outstanding, even in Japan, is the island of Okinawa, where many people grow very old very healthily. It is not only dietary diversity that contributes to a long and healthy life. The Okinawans have a useful saying: “Hara hachi bu,” which loosely translates to “only fill up to 80%”. Unlike many of us, they don’t snack, but leave their intestines several hours to process the food. And they move a lot – from walking to dancing and martial arts.

Four Easy Rules for Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

So when I approach the buffet, I like picking a little bit of everything – which is fun, contributes to an interesting breakfast conversation, and might even be a smart move for my brain function and mental health!

The real challenge at a buffet, of course, is not to overeat.

Otsuka, R., Nishita, Y., Tange, C., Tomida, M., Kato, Y., Nakamoto, M., Imai, T., Ando, F. & Hiroshi Shimokata, H. Dietary diversity decreases the risk of cognitive decline among Japanese older adults, Geriatr Gerontol Int, 17: 937–944 (2017)  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/ggi.12817

Please share and like us:

Assessing someone’s diet can be tricky and particularly time-consuming. People choose from millions of groceries every day, and the vast range of products available adds a further level of complexity to accurately assessing diet. Traditionally, dietary research is based on food diaries, meaning participants keep record of what they eat and drink by writing it down on paper. To extract nutritional information, researchers have to input the paper-based data into nutrient analysis software by hand, which is extremely time-consuming and error-prone. Furthermore, each country has local and distinct food products to offer. These differences need to be considered when assessing nutritional intake in an international project such as New Brain Nutrition.

Faced with these difficulties we are delighted to announce the use of the online 24-h dietary assessment tool “Measure Your Food On One Day (myfood24)” at the University Hospital in Frankfurt for our project. The study aims to investigate the effects of exercise and nutrition on behavioural measures regarding impulsive, compulsive and externalising behaviours.

myfood24 is a quick and easy online dietary assessment tool that tracks, monitors, and analyses dietary intake.

myfood24 is based on a novel approach to assess food intake through technology.

A collaborative project between the University of Leeds (PI Prof Janet Cade) and Imperial College London recognized the need for a valid, reliable, low burden and user-friendly dietary assessment tool. Funded by a UK Medical Research Council grant, the team of experts developed and tested myfood24 for a wide range of age groups including adolescents, adults and older adults and validated myfood24 against a suite of biomarkers.

Participants enter all the foods and drinks they have consumed during one day (from midnight to midnight) into the online tool. They can choose from an extensive range of food items including generic foods (e.g. milk chocolate) and branded products (e.g. milka & daim chocolate). Food portion images are available for a variety of items to help quantify consumed foods. myfood24 is easy to use with no training required; it can also be interviewer-administered. These features help to maximise participation throughout the research project and to cater to a wide range of research project types, study participants and clinical needs.

The academic rigor, automated data processing, and immediate production of results contribute to improved data quality and a drastic time reduction.

myfood24 has 4 country-specific versions available: United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and Australia. These include localised food databases and translations.

A teaching version is also available in the United Kingdom; it has been tailored to a classroom situation and allows for immediate feedback from the whole class to be explored together (without aggregating information elsewhere). Feedback includes a variety of visual and easy-to-interpret graphs at both the individual and group level and includes over 100 different nutrients. myfood24 has wide application in research, teaching and health settings, globally.

Click here to try a free demo of myfood24.

Further information on myfood24 can be found on the myfood24 website.

myfood24 was developed through Medical Research Council funding, grant G110235 by a collaborative project between the University of Leeds (PI Prof Janet Cade) and Imperial College, London. Requests to use myfood24 should be made to enquiries@myfood24.org

Please share and like us: