Dry January, a phenomenon that started in Scandinavia and has now gained more popularity in other parts of Europe. During “Dry January” people challenge themselves to temporary abstinence from alcohol for one month, in order to detox their bodies after the holiday season. The media states that one-month alcohol abstinence has a beneficial effect on your sleep pattern, alertness, mood, weight, skin, and your liver. Because I am currently participating in Dry January I was wondering if the results of alcohol abstinence for a short period of time are studied, and what these results might be.

Before we can understand what beneficial effects a month without alcohol can have, we need to know what alcohol does to our body. Alcohol has, amongst other things, an influence on our liver and on our mental health. When we consume alcohol, a part of the brain that is related to reward becomes active: the striatum. Also, dopamine is released which has an influence on feelings of reward and the control of impulsive behaviour. While the striatum is activated, the prefrontal cortex is inhibited which regulates impulses and emotion regulation.

When we consume an alcoholic beverage, the alcohol is absorbed in our blood which in turn is filtered by our liver. Alcohol damages the liver by stimulating the liver cells, which causes them to die. This leads to scarring of liver cells (fibrosis) and to shrinkage of the liver itself (cirrose). People with liver cirrose have a higher chance of developing liver cancer. The positive part of this story is the self-recovery function of our liver. Your liver can recover for up to 70% if you put aside alcohol for at least one month.

Researchers from the RadboudUMC1 in Nijmegen (2017) and the University of Sussex2 (2015) studied voluntarily temporary abstinence from alcohol to gain more insight in the effects of alcohol abstinence and alcohol use after Dry January and to gain more insight in the possibility of health-related benefits.

After going for a month without alcohol, 62% of the people reported better sleep and more energy2 and 57% had more concentration. Also, alertness was tested: participants who drank alcohol showed more impulsivity and were, therefore, quicker, but made more mistakes. After Dry January these participants reacted slightly slower but more accurate.

Also, various health-related benefits were reported: less liver cells were stimulated (2) or died (1), 54% had better skin and 70% had generally improved health (2). Also a reduction in belly fat was measured (1), this can be explained by the process in which the body breaks down fat cells, this process is slowed down by alcohol. Besides, the lowering of belly fat is also a result of a reduction of calorie intake (one glass of wine, for instance, has 82 kcal). Another quite important benefit: 88% of the participants saved money (2).

Before these studies, there was some negative criticism against Dry January. Professionals were scared that people would experience a rebound effect after the dry month, resulting in more alcohol consumption. However, the results reveal the opposite: one month of alcohol abstinence led to less alcohol consumption in the following six months (2). Saying “No” to alcohol for a month created an awareness about the effects of alcohol and the participants gained insight into their drinking behaviour (2).

Taken together it seems that quitting alcohol, even for a short period of time, has lots of beneficial effects. No reason to not try a dry month this year!

REFERENCES
1. Munsterman, I. Tjwa, E., Schellekens A. (2017). “Lever rust uit van een maand niet drinken”. https://dekennisvannu.nl/site/special/Een-maand-zonder-alcohol/82

2. De Visser, R.O., Robinson, E., Bond, R. (2016) Voluntary temporary abstinence from alcohol during “Dry January” and subsequent alcohol use. Health Psychology, Vol 35(3), 281-289

Please share and like us:
error

Whenever I ask my patients, if they are eating their “5 a day”, the immediate answer is “Yes, sure”. However, sometimes I´m not sure if their “Yes, sure” belongs to their real eating behavior or if it is more like wishful thinking. This question applies for a broad range of behavior, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, having enough sleep, walking the 10.000 steps a day etc.. But how can we be sure what people really do in their everyday life?

The answer is: Ambulatory Assessment

Ambulatory Assessment is the state of the art method for assessing current emotional states, feelings, and behavior in the natural environment of an individual’s everyday life. Equipped with smartphones and accelerometers, it is feasible to track how individuals feel at specific moments, what they are eating across a day and how they physically behave in real time and real life. Electronic e-diaries, provided by an App, prompt individuals whenever an event occur or randomly several times a day. Especially in patient groups with attention deficits, prompting short questionnaires several times a day show better recall than an extensive end-of-day questionnaire.

In the past, food-diaries were based on unhandy and retrospective paper-pencil-questionnaires or computer input. Nowadays, new technological opportunities pave the way to e-food-diaries on smartphones, enabling an immediate and flexible input capability. The design of e-food-diary-apps may be different, i.e., by photos, drop-down-menu, text, or voice records. Important is the documentation of what and how much the participants eat and drink and a database that can be connected to an international or national food code for data analysis.

In the Eat2beNICE research project, we assess food intake every time participants eat or drink by a drop-down-menu that leads from general to very detailed food-items and asks for general meal portions and amounts every time participants eat and drink across the day. If a participant cannot find a particular food-item, he or she has the opportunity to enter a free text message or to record a voice message. If participants forget to enter some foods and drinks across the day, they will receive a reminder in the evening to add forgotten items. This procedure enables very accurate tracking of participant’s food intake in our study.

To sum up, thanks to modern technology we can now accurately measure what a person feels, does and eats throughout the day. Of course, the design of an e-food-diary on the smartphone depends on the projects’- and samples’ requirements. Overall, it has to be easy to use, easy to implement in daily life and to be fun for the participants to obtain a high level of compliance and a high-quality database.

REFERENCES:
Ebner-Priemer, U. W., & Trull, T. J. (2009). Ambulatory Assessment: An Innovative and Promising Approach for Clinical Psychology. European Psychologist, 14, 109–119. https://doi.org/10.1027/1016-9040.14.2.109.

Engel, S. G., Crosby, Ross, Thomas, G., Bond, D., Lavender, J. M., Mason, T., . . . Wonderlich, Stephen. (2016). Ecological Momentary Assessment in Eating Disorder and Obesity Research: a Review of the Recent Literature. Current Psychiatry Reports, 18, 37. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-016-0672-7.

Fuller, N. R., Fong, M., Gerofi, J., Ferkh, F., Leung, C., Leung, L., . . . Caterson, I. D. (2017). Comparison of an electronic versus traditional food diary for assessing dietary intake-A validation study. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 11, 647–654. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2017.04.001.

Smyth, J., Wonderlich, S., Crosby, R., Miltenberger, R., Mitchell, J., & Rorty, M. (2001). The use of ecological momentary assessment approaches in eating disorder research. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 30, 83–95.

Stein, K. F., & Corte, C. M. (2003). Ecologic momentary assessment of eating-disordered behaviors. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 34, 349–360. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.10194.

Please share and like us:
error

The more diverse we eat, the more diverse our gut microbiome (i.e., the composition of trillions of microbes in our intestine) will become. Sounds reasonable, right? But – why is that a good thing?

Well, research has shown that a diverse gut microbiome is less susceptible to diseases, such as the well-known western lifestyle associated diseases like diabetes or Crohn’s disease (1). This might be because one’s microbiome and one’s immune system are closely linked. A healthy and diverse microbiome thus might support proper functioning of our immune system and help keeping us healthy.

Eating a variety of different food items also enhances the odds that your body gets all the nutrients like vitamins or minerals it needs for proper functioning. This can have an effect on our well-being as well as on our physical appearance, like shiny hair, strong fingernails and healthy-looking skin.

Besides, research suggests that the more diverse we eat, the better our cognitive abilities might be at older age (see my blog on this topic here:
http://newbrainnutrition.com/four-easy-rules-for-healthy-eating-and-lifestyle/)! Well, how about that!? Research supports the notion that our gut and our brain are more closely linked than we would have assumed. This would mean that our food choices can actually have an effect on our mental health. Great, right?

So let’s have a look at a few simple tips with which you can easily enhance your dietary diversity, and can have fun along the way, too!

1. Add seeds and nuts to your meals
2. Eat a set menu
3. Grow your own fresh herbs
4. Enlarge the variety of what you drink
5. Try alternatives to your staple foods
6. Try new dishes, restaurants and cuisines
7. Join a food cooperative
8. Distribute your homemade meals across different days
9. Experiment with seasonings
10. Try smoothies and soups
11. Share your meals
And the golden rule you should keep in mind:
12. Avoid antibiotics

Add seeds and nuts to your meals
By keeping a variety of seeds and nuts at home, you can easily add them to your meals. If you tend to overeat on nuts (and believe me, many people do), make sure to buy unsalted ones, and simply sprinkle them on top of your muesli, salad or sandwich. Nuts (like peanuts, walnuts, hazelnuts) and seeds (like sesame or flaxseed) are a great source of very healthy fats, important vitamins like B-vitamins and vitamin E, and they contain fibres, which our gut simply loves!

Eat a set menu
Yes, you heard me. This is my advice to select a sequence of dishes, instead of only one.
This will definitely result in a larger variety of what you eat. Of course, you should be aware of the overall amount of food – listen to your gut feeling! And I’m serious, this also includes dessert! If you have a little soup, a colorful salad, a light main course and a small treat, you’ve supplied your body with a variety of different nutrients it needs to stay healthy. My extra tip: Keep in mind to include your ‘five a day’ to make sure you eat enough fruit and especially enough vegetables.

Grow your own fresh herbs
Do you notice that food pictures look more appealing when the food is sprinkled with fresh herbs? It will also appeal to your gut! Adding one or two fresh herbs to a dish will give it that little extra twist that it deserves. All it takes is a plant pot on your window sill. Some herbs can be harvested throughout the whole year, and for even more diversity, you can experiment with different plants as you go.

Enlarge the variety of what you drink
Tea or coffee? Both, please! When we think of nutritional diversity, let’s not only consider solid food. Imagine having your coffee and a glass of orange juice (or even a multivitamin drink) with your breakfast. How about some green or black tea as the day goes by? Or an apple spritzer? Herbal teas also offer a great range of different ingredients, and can be soothing in the evening. Just keep in mind that if you taste a few different lemonades, you well might enhance your variety of drinks, but you will consume a lot of sugar, too. The world health organization recommends that maximally 10% of your energy should come from sugar (2), which should be considered when ordering a drink.

Try alternatives to your staple foods
Are you a muesli guy? Or more of a bread person? Do you prefer pasta as your everyday dish or is your menu dominated by rice? Most of us tend to eat the same basic food items every day. But even here is the chance to enhance diversity: Instead of rice, try couscous, amaranth or millet. Buy a different type of bread every time you go to the bakery. Muesli offers a great chance of variety, you can add honey, yoghurt, marmalade, berries, spices… Talk to your friends to get more ideas.

Try new dishes, restaurants and cuisines
Every cuisine has its own flavours, specific components, and style. So why not raiding cook books and food blogs for inspiration? If you go out to eat, just be curious and pick the restaurant you always wanted to try, yet ending up at the same place you always went. This doesn’t only increase your daily diversity, but also the one across days, which is especially important: Imagine you create a super diverse menu and then eat it day after day after day… Sounds boring, right? Your gut will share this opinion! My extra tip: Choose restaurants that offer a buffet every now and then. This is specifically handy around lunchtime because you don’t have to wait for your food. Again, take a bit of everything, but be careful not to overload your plate. This gives you the chance to try out what you like when you taste a novel cuisine. And imagine the looks you get when you say “Hey, I’m doing this for my microbiome!”

Join a food cooperative
You know that homemade cooking is great. You are in charge of what goes into the pan, you control the ingredients’ quality. But, of course, it requires planning, shopping, cooking – not to forget cleaning the kitchen. An easy step towards a diverse, regular cooking habit is joining a cooperative or booking home delivery from organic farms nearby. You get a box full of seasonal, fresh, local fruit and veg delivered to your door weekly. If you know where it comes from, you might be more reluctant to throw it out, hence you might actually cook it and eat it! The surprising variety of what a season has to offer will boost your cooking creativity and enhance your nutritional diversity even further.

Some might object now and remark that when they look at the back of their ready-to-eat supermarket meals, is states that there are so many ingredients in one package, that there is no need to enhance nutritional diversity even more. Sure, there is a point there! But keep in mind that these foods are massively processed, thus having lost many of the original ingredients’ benefits like vitamins, etc. Also, if you look closely, you might detect declarations you don’t even know what they mean! Those different additives, like E-numbers, are mostly artificially produced, and there is long-term research missing what they actually do to our bodies – especially in interaction with all the other additives found in processed food. Don’t get me wrong – every now and then I also grab a bag of ready-to-eat food from the counter.
But what I personally do is to subtract the artificial ingredients from my daily diversity calculation (and now you also know that I like math).

Distribute your homemade meals across different days
This is the same approach as eating a set menu. Imagine you make yourself a nice pasta dish for the evening, and prepare a mixed salad for lunch the next day. How about splitting both in half? That way you expand your food across days, yet adding more daily eatables at the same time. Your microbiome will like the variety that goes along with this. Plus, you don’t have to buy canteen food the next day and might save some money – money that could be spent at the fancy restaurant we talked about earlier on!

And yes, distributing food across days also applies to cake and desserts. If you baked a cake (consider adding lots of fruit), have one piece now and one tomorrow! And remember to send your mum a picture of your delicious achievements, she will love it!

Experiment with seasonings
If you go through the seasonings in your kitchen cupboard, you will notice that some seasonings provide a literal boost for your nutritional diversity. I just found a curry powder with 13 ingredients! Of course, if you start and mix different seasonings, a few compounds will be redundant. But when you cook – or simply heat up a bought dish – add that little extra. That way, you can even reduce the amount of salt without giving up on flavour. The world health organization recommends 5 grams of salt per day (2). Simply use high-quality seasoning and herb mixtures instead, maybe add a drop of fine oil for flavour, and let it surprise you!

Try smoothies and soups
For a quick energy boost in the morning, I recommend a smoothie. What I love about smoothies? You can virtually throw everything in there, and by adding just a few ingredients for flavour (like oranges) and texture (like bananas) you can create a tasty and always different vitamin shot. Again, remember seasoning like curcuma or cinnamon to increase variety and diversity. For later meals, there are great recipes for soups – even some that don’t require cooking! If you blend your soup, you can easily ‘hide’ some leftovers in there, or some bits of a vegetable you don’t really like.

Share your meals
This is my favourite tip. Have you noticed that also during lunch with colleagues, the grass is always greener on the other side? In our lab, we have switched to a food sharing concept where everybody can take a bit of everyone’s meal. In some cultures, like Corea, it is common to place all the food one orders in the middle of the table. They know that sharing is caring – especially caring about one’s microbiome diversity!

And last, not least: Avoid antibiotics!
Of course, there are some illnesses where antibiotics are essential. But did you know that animals are fed large amounts of antibiotics, and that we consume them, too, when we indulge into our chicken breast or piece of veal? These antibiotics not only kill unwanted microbes, they also heavily disrupt the ecology of our microbiome (3). So in order to keep your gut happy and to get the most out of your nutritional diversity experiment, think twice before you buy or order conventionally produced meat. Consider organic meat or vegetarian alternatives – hence adding even more possibilities for a diverse menu.

(1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3577372/
(2) http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/healthy-diet
(3) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4831151/

Want to learn more? Visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zpf27hv#z8qrg82 for a little quiz and some more information and https://experiencelife.com/article/your-microbiome-the-ecosystem-inside/ to find out more about your microbiome.

 

Please share and like us:
error

A little while ago, this blog featured an entry by Annick Bosch on the TRACE study, an amazing intervention study using the Elimination Diet to treat ADHD in kids (https://newbrainnutrition.com/adhd-and-elimination-diet/). Very shortly summarized, the Elimination Diet entails that participants can only eat a very restricted set of foodstuffs for several weeks, which can greatly reduce the number of ADHD symptoms in some kids. Subsequently, new foodstuffs are added back into the diet one by one, all the time checking that ADHD symptoms do not return. This ensures that every child for which the Elimination Diet proves successful ends up with a unique diet which suppresses their ADHD symptoms.

Now this is a fascinating study, since it indicates a direct influence of diet on ADHD behavior. What we know from the neurobiology of ADHD, is that it is caused by a myriad of relatively small changes in the structure, connectivity and functioning of several brain networks 1. For the most common treatments of ADHD, like medication with methylphenidate 2, we can quite accurately see the changes these interventions have on brain functioning. However, for the Elimination Diet, this has not been studied before at all. This is why we are now starting with the TRACE-MRI study, where kids that participate in a diet intervention in the TRACE program, are also asked to join for two sessions in an MRI scanner. Once before the start of the diet, and once again after 5 weeks, when the strictest phase of the Elimination Diet concludes. In the MRI scanner, we will look at the structure of the brain, at the connectivity of the brain, and at the functioning of the brain using two short psychological tasks. We made a short vlog detailing the experience of some of our first volunteers for this MRI session.

 

 

With the addition of this MRI session, we hope to be able to see the changes in brain structure and function over the first 5 weeks of the diet intervention. This will help us establish a solid biological foundation of how diet can influence the brain in general, and ADHD symptoms specifically. It can also show us if the effect of the Elimination Diet is found in the same brain networks and systems which respond to medication treatment. And lastly, we can see if there is a difference in the brains for those participants for whom the diet has a strong effect versus those where the diet does little or nothing to improve their ADHD symptoms. This can then help us identify for which people a dietary intervention would be a good alternative to standard treatment.

We will update you on the TRACE-MRI study and on the developments in this field right here on this blog!

 

REFERENCES
Faraone, S. V et al. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ­­­. Nat. Rev. Dis. Prim. 1, (2015).

Konrad, K., Neufang, S., Fink, G. R. & Herpertz-Dahlmann, B. Long-term effects of methylphenidate on neural networks associated with executive attention in children with ADHD: results from a longitudinal functional MRI study. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry 46, 1633–41 (2007).

Please share and like us:
error

Have you ever noticed that the type of food you eat can affect how you feel afterwards? Some food might make you wish to rest and relax, some food might give you the little extra energy you just needed. Evidence is accumulating that also in the long run, diet may play a pivotal role for your mental health. For example, it might have an effect on impulsive and compulsive behaviour [1].
But it’s not only the diet that affects our body, mind and brain – it’s also the amount of what we eat. Research shows that people don’t necessarily know what a suitable amount of food might be. Sure you can imagine that this can easily lead to obesity – which in turn can impair our general health.

A meta-analysis (that is, a study that investigates an effect among many independent studies that have been conducted so far) from 2018 came to the conclusion that serving size and the size of the tableware has an effect on the amount we eat: When offered larger-sized portions, packages or tableware, participants ate or drank more than when offered smaller-sized versions [2].

British nutritional scientists now developed a guideline for the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) to help people estimate the suitable serving size. For example, they recommend that when having a pasta dish, you should take as much pasta for one person as fits into both of your hands (before cooking). A portion of fish or meat should be about half the size of your hand. However, this does not mean that when you eat more than one portion, you are an overeater.

According to their tipsheets, which can be found here,
https://www.nutrition.org.uk/healthyliving/find-your-balance/portionwise.html
one should compose his or her daily menu based on a mixture of different portions. For example, 3-4 portions of starchy carbohydrates (such as the above-mentioned pasta) are recommended daily. Their guidelines, however, offer a few handy (literally!) advises to help you get a sense of how much food you should consume, thus preventing you from overeating. With a few simple tips kept in mind, you can do some good for your physical and mental health, daily.

REFERENCES
[1] Sarris J, Logan AC, Akbaraly TN, Amminger GP, Balanzá-Martínez V, Freeman MP, et al. Nutritional medicine as mainstream in psychiatry. Lancet Psychiatry. 2015; 2(3):271-4.
View here:
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(14)00051-0/fulltext

[2] Hollands GJ, Shemilt I, Marteau TM, Jebb SA, Lewis HB, Wei Y, Higgins JPT,
Ogilvie D. Portion, package or tableware size for changing selection and consumption of food, alcohol and tobacco. Cochrane Database of Systematic
Reviews 2015, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD011045. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011045.pub2
View here:
https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD011045.pub2/full

Please share and like us:
error

We have talked before about how ADHD has been associated with obesity and the mechanisms implicated on it. I would like to explain more about this important subject so you can understand what dietary changes you can make to avoid the risk of weight gain. Most of the authors attribute the presence of obesity in ADHD individuals to disorder eating patterns, especially overeating, that means that these people are eating a higher amount of calories per day in comparison of individuals without ADHD. When a person consumes more calories or food than their body needs they start to gaining weight and this happens to all kind of people, I’m not talking only about those who have ADHD, and that becomes a health problem.

Nevertheless, there is a recent study that suggests that ADHD-obesity relationship was linked to unhealthy food choices, rather than overeating behavior (1). This means that ADHD individuals are eating the same amounts of calories per day as healthy ones, but their food choices are not good enough to meet the dietary recommendations and can lead to nutritional deficiencies that have been observed on these patients (2,3). These kinds of patients tend to eat more processed meat, unhealthy snacks, and refined cereals; instead of consuming healthy food choices like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and fish.

We can suggest that this problem it may be due to the fact that there is a lack of information related to nutrition, so it is easy to get confused on which food products are healthy and which are not.

When you go to the supermarket, you will find a lot of food options that have a label that says “light” or “healthy,” and you may buy them without analyzing if they are genuinely healthy.

So the question is “how can you know if a product is healthy or not?”

First of all, you should opt to buy fresh products such as fruits, vegetables and fish (foods that are rich in vitamins and minerals needed to maintain our mental health in good shape). And avoid consuming fast, packaged or canned food because these kinds of products contain a lot of sodium, sugar, fat, preservatives, additives and components that in high amounts can lead to health issues.

Second, if you need to buy food products that are packaged or canned, you should be able to read and understand the nutritional information and ingredients before you buy them to be sure they are the healthiest options on the market.

Here I share an example on what to search on nutrition facts labels of food products to make the right selection.

For more information on how to understand and use the nutrition facts label you can visit: www.fda.gov/food/labelingnutrition/ucm274593.htm#see3

This was co-authored by Josep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, MD PhD psychiatrist and Head of Department of Psychiatry at Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona, Spain. He is also a professor at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

REFERENCES
1. Hershko S, Aronis A, Maeir A, Pollak Y. Dysfunctional Eating Patterns of Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. J Nerv Ment Dis [Internet]. 2018;206(11):870–4.

2. Kotsi E, Kotsi E, Perrea DN. Vitamin D levels in children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a meta-analysis. Atten Defic Hyperact Disord [Internet]. Springer Vienna; 2018.

3. Landaas ET, Aarsland TIM, Ulvik A, Halmøy A, Ueland PM, Haavik J. Vitamin levels in adults with ADHD. Br J Psychiatry Open [Internet]. 2016;2(6):377–84.

Please share and like us:
error

Increasing evidence is showing that the gut microbiota can alter the brain and behavior, and thus may play a role in the development of psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia.

Animal models are a useful tool to study this mechanism. For example, germ-free (GF) mice, which have never been exposed to microorganisms, are compared with mice exposed to microorganisms, known as conventional colonized mice (CC). Recent studies have schizophrenia and autismreported that GF animals show increased response to stress, as well as reduced anxiety and memory. In most cases, these alterations are restricted to males, in which there are higher incidence rates of neurodevelopmental disorders compared with females.

Mice, like humans, are a social species and are used to study social behavior. A recent study compared GF and CC mice using different sociability tests. GF mice showed impairments in social behavior compared with CC mice, particularly in males. Interestingly, they demonstrate that social deficits can be reversed by bacterial colonization of  the GF gut (GFC), achieving normal social behavior.

Microbiota seem to be crucial for social behaviors, including social motivation and preference for social novelty. Microbiota also regulate repetitive behaviors, characteristic of several disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

Bacterial colonization can change brain function and behavior, suggesting that microbial-based interventions in later life could improve social impairments and be a useful tool to effect the symptoms of these disorders.

This blog was co-authored by Noèlia Fernàndez and Judit Cabana

Please share and like us:
error


Welcome to New Brain Nutrition. You can enjoy FREE Online Courses when you Log In or Join here.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 728018

New Brain Nutrition is a project and brand of Eat2BeNice, a consortium of 18 European University Hospitals throughout the continent.

Partners:
You may log in here to our Intranet website with your authorized user name and password.