In the Eat2beNICE project, the researchers aim at studying the effect of diet and mental health and our blogs are meant to enlighten readers.

Every day research findings published in journals will offer an opinion on how to best live our lives. It is simply not possible, nor advised, to change your habit after every piece of new knowledge. On the other hand, researchers do need to publish their results in order to have their findings discussed and reproduced. How do you as a reader navigate?

No single study should alone be enough to change nutritional advice or guidelines. The research into a specific field is best understood when looking at several pieces of knowledge (or publications) as contributing to a bigger picture. Kim Tingley wrote a descriptive picture in the New York Times Magazine on how to view scientific findings. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/16/magazine/how-much-alcohol-can-you-drink-safe-health.html Here he writes that the process of understanding the contribution of scientific research should be like looking through a lens and asking yourself if it is clearer or less clear with this particular piece of new information.

Interpreting results from a study isn’t always easy and the limitations of the study can sometimes be difficult to spot. If you are feeling bombarded by the media with constant new findings, be aware that single findings are one piece of information, usually not the full picture and should be interpreted as such. For more information on matters of interests, a good place to start is looking at literature reviews or in the Cochrane Library https://www.cochranelibrary.com/ which will offer views on important publications within a field and help you interpret status quo.

REFERENCES

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MoBa is short for The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study which is a large pregnancy observational study. During the years 1999-2008 pregnant women in Norway were recruited to the study. The study is conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Questionnaires regarding health, diet and environment were sent out to the women during and after pregnancy. Women are sent regular follow-up questionnaires. As the child grows up, the child also completes questionnaires. In addition, the fathers were invited to participate with a questionnaire when their partner was pregnant. Biological samples were also collected from the mother, father and child. Today there are 114 500 children, 95 000 mothers and 75 000 fathers participating in the study.

https://www.fhi.no/en/studies/moba/

The study was set up to gain knowledge about the causes behind serious disease. The study is unique because it gathers information from fetal (in vitro) life and follows the offspring into adulthood. In this manner it is possible to look at early influences and later disease. The study is prospective, which means that information about mothers, fathers and their offspring is registered before a disease has manifested itself. With this design, women are asked questions several times during her pregnancy and do not have to try to remember what she did when looking back at her pregnancy.

MoBa is population-based and became nationwide with 50 participating hospitals in Norway. For more information on the many publications based on MoBa data, visit this link:

https://www.fhi.no/en/studies/moba/for-forskere-artikler/publications/

The participating women in MoBa also filled in a questionnaire about eating habits before and during pregnancy.

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Cigarette smoking may give immediate pleasure but is dangerous for your health. Smoking may be seen as a way to deal with feelings like anxiety and stress and may be viewed as a way of coping with everyday life. Smoking a cigarette may also be used as a reward, and as part of a celebration of big and small victories. But what happens to your mental well-being if you quit smoking?

Smoke cessation is one of the best things, if not the best, you can do for your health! Smoking is ranked as the second leading cause of death by a body called “the Global Burden of Disease 2017 Risk Factor Collaborators”.1 Quitting smoking lowers your risk of cardiovascular diseases and your risk of cancer. 2 But does this come at a price concerning your mental health – how is that impacted by quitting smoking?

A systematic review of 26 studies assessing mental health before and after smoking cessation found that quitting was associated with mental health benefits. 3 Assessment of mental health were made both in the general population and in clinical populations, including persons with physical or psychiatric conditions. In the included studies, the assessment of mental status at least 6 weeks after cessation was compared with the baseline assessment. Smoking cessation was associated with improvements in levels of anxiety, depression, stress and psychological quality of life. The authors point to clinicians to recommend smoking cessation interventions also among smokers with mental health problems.

There are several aides to be used by smoke quitters. These span from brief advice to nicotine replacement therapy. How do you get help for smoking cessation? Talk to your doctor about it! And don’t give up if you fail at a quit attempt! Each attempt will bring you closer to the status “former smoker”.

REFERENCES:

  1. Collaborators GBDRF. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Lancet 2018;392:1923-94.
  2. https://www.who.int/tobacco/quitting/benefits/en/
  3. Taylor G, McNeill A, Girling A, Farley A, Lindson-Hawley N, Aveyard P. Change in mental health after smoking cessation: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2014;348:g1151. https://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g1151

 

 

 

 

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This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 728018

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