Shine a Light on ADHD

October is international ADHD Awareness month. Young researchers of the MiND research project and 4QuarterFilms just published this short documentary that shines a light on living with ADHD, from a personal and a scientific perspective.

Watch the video here: http://newbrainnutrition.com/adhd-shine-a-light/

We thank the following professionals who were interviewed in this video:
Dr. Barbara Franke and Dr. Corina Greven, of Donders Institute, Radboud University Medical Center
Dr. Philip Asherson, Dr. Eric Taylor, and Dr. Kai Syng Tan of King’s College London
Mrs. Andrea Bilbao of ADDISS, ADHD Europe
We also thank ms. Evie Travers, mr. Bryn Travers and mr. Aziz who were interviewed in this video.

Shine_a_Light_on_ADHDThe film was made possible with the help of the EU-funded programs:
MiND (EU horizon 2020 program no 643051) http://mind-project.eu/
Aggressotype (EU FP7 program No 602805) http://www.aggressotype.eu/
CoCA (EU horizon 2020 program No 667302) http://coca-project.eu/
Eat2beNICE (EU horizon 2020 program No 728018). http://newbrainnutrition.com/

 

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A team of Iranian researchers recently published a meta-analysis seeking to determine what, if any, association there may be between low Vitamin D levels and ADHD in children and adolescents.

Combining the results from thirteen studies with 10,334 participants, they found that youth with ADHD had “modest but significant” lower serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D than normally developing children. The weighted mean difference was just under 7 nanograms per milliliter. The odds of obtaining such a result by chance would be less than one in a thousand (p < .001). There was little to no sign of publication bias. Between-study heterogeneity, however, was very high (I2 = 94).

Vitamin D and ADHDThese results suggest an association. But are low serum levels of Vitamin D a cause or effect of ADHD? Causation is vastly more difficult to establish than association. To begin to tease this out, the researchers identified four prospective studies that compared maternal Vitamin D levels with the subsequent development of ADHD symptoms in their children. Two of these used maternal serum levels, and two used umbilical cord serum levels. Together, these studies found that low maternal Vitamin D levels were associated with a 40% higher risk of ADHD in their children. Whether maternal serum or umbilical cord serum measurements were used had little or no effect on the outcome. Study heterogeneity was negligible. But the authors noted that this result “should be considered with caution” because it was heavily dependent on one of the prospective studies included in the analysis. All of which suggests a need for further prospective studies.

In the meantime, the authors suggest it would be prudent to increase sun exposure and Vitamin D supplementation given the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency.

REFERENCES

Yadollah Khoshbakht, Reza Bidaki, and Amin Salehi-Abargouei, “Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies,” Advances in Nutrition, vol. 9, issue 1, p. 9-20 (2018).

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In studies about treatment for children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), it is important to use valid and reliable instruments to measure effects. A valid instrument can measure a difference in symptoms before and some time after the treatment has started. Usually questionnaires for parents and teachers are used.

In the TRACE project, currently running in the Netherlands, we are looking at the effectiveness of a dietary intervention versus care as usual, for children diagnosed with ADHD in the age group of 5-12 year old. In addition to the standard questionnaires, there is an observation instrument called the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS). This instrument was added in the TRACE project as an objective measurement for changes in behavior.

DB-DOS, ADHDThe DB-DOS was originally developed to measure disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) in preschoolers1. This way, treatment effects are not only measured in an indirect way, through information of caregivers, but also in a direct observation in the clinical setting. However, the age range of the children in the TRACE project is different from the preschoolers the DB-DOS was originally intented for. That’s why the TRACE project added several tasks to the original DB-DOS, to make sure it elicits disruptive behaviours, as well as hyperactivity and impulsivity, and to make it suitable for older children. During the current trial we try to find out if the DB-DOS is also a valid measurement for older children, aged 5-12 years.

The DB-DOS uses three different interactional contexts: parent-child context, examiner-child context and parent-examiner-child context. Children will be asked to complete different tasks. Some are rather boring, or frustrating, to see if this may elicit attention problems, hyperactivity, impulsive behaviour or disruptive behaviors. The DB-DOS contains, for example, some tasks which can evoke anger or sadness and some tasks where children get the chance to cheat. The reaction of the child is observed from behind a one-way screen. The observation lasts about 60 minutes and afterwards the observed behavior is scored by the examiner through a coding system. With more evidence-based instruments, mental health problems can be targeted more efficiently and reliably.

Our final goal is earlier interventions which prevent mental health problems in these children getting more severe and spreading through other domains such as school, work, or social contacts.

We will keep you posted about the results of the DB-DOS in the TRACE project!

REFERENCE
1 Bunte, T. L., Laschen, S., Schoemaker, K., Hessen, D. J., Van der Heijden, P. G. M., & Matthys, W. (2013). Clinical Usefulness of Observational Assessment in the Diagnosis of DBD and ADHD in Preschoolers. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 42(6), p.p. 749-761.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2013.773516

 

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In every classroom approximately two children are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). They struggle with attention problems and hyperactive and impulsive behavior. This has negative consequences for these children. For example, they can have difficulties learning, it puts them at risk for other psychiatric problems, and it can cause parent-child relationship problems. Therefore, children with ADHD do need some sort of treatment for optimizing the quality of their lives.

After psycho-education to the child, parents and teacher, medication is often the first choice of treatment because it is evidence-based. However, there is a growing group of parents that do not wish to medicate their child. They are concerned about the side and long-term effects. Thus, these parents seek other treatment. That is where they get stuck: which other effective treatments are available?

In order to develop new treatments, there is a growing field of research focusing on risk factors for ADHD symptoms. One of these risk factors that has been studied increasingly is nutrition. Nutrition plays a role in physical well-being, but could also play a role in psychological well-being and cognitive functioning. Consequently, dietary treatments could be an alternative treatment for children with ADHD. There is a long history of research in nutrition, but there is not enough evidence yet about the (cost-)effectiveness to implement dietary treatments in clinical health care.

Elimination DietSo far, studies examining the effectiveness of a so-called elimination diet showed the strongest effects (1). The aim of an elimination diet is to find out which products trigger ADHD symptoms. However, results of these studies are inconclusive because of several limitations. First, outcome measurements used in these studies were not objective. Second, studies suffered from a sample bias towards highly motivated and educated parents. Third, underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Fourth, long-term effects are unknown. Moreover, it is unknown if an elimination diet is more effective in reducing ADHD symptoms than a healthy diet based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines (2).

We thought: can we take into account these limitations and examine the effectiveness of two dietary treatments? This resulted in the TRACE study: ‘Treatment of ADHD with Care as usual versus an Elimination diet’ (TRACE) study. This is the first study to determine the short- and long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two dietary treatments as initial addition to care as usual as a treatment trajectory for children with ADHD.

We will substantially improve upon previous studies by implementing the intervention in non-commercial mental health centers, including blinded and objective measurements, and comparing two dietary treatments with care as usual. Also, understanding the biological effects could inform clinicians to potential markers and targets for preventative or individualized treatment. For this reason, we also examine the underlying biological mechanisms (e.g. mechanisms in the gut and brain) of dietary treatments (TRACE-BIOME and TRACE-MRI studies). We collect blood, stool and saliva samples.

The TRACE study is a two arm randomized control trial: participants are randomized to either an elimination diet or a healthy diet. The comparator arm includes children who are being treated with care as usual. Currently, we included in each dietary treatment arm about half of the targeted participants (N=81 in each dietary group). In the care as usual group, we included about one third of the targeted participants (N=60).

We hope to finish inclusion around January 2020.   am really looking forward to the results and hope to share this with you in a couple of years! If you have any questions, feel free to contact us via trace@karakter.com

References:

(1) Nigg, J. T., Lewis, K., Edinger, T., & Falk, M. (2012). Meta-analysis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms,         restriction diet, and synthetic food color additives. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 51(1), 86-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2011.    10.015 . Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321798/

(2) Izquierdo Pulido, M. L., Ríos Hernández, A., Farran, A., & Alda, J. Á. (2015). The role of  diet and physical activity in children and adolescents with ADHD. Recent Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences V, 2015, Research Signpost. Chapter 4, p. 51-64.  Link: http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/bitstream/2445/67543/1/T_1444299316Munozv%204.pdf

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What makes some of us more likely to drive over the speed limit, participate in extreme sports or make decisions that can impact health over time? Risk-taking behavior has distinct subtypes (for example disinhibition, sensation seeking, calculated risks, impulsivity) that develop due to the complex interplay of different factors: our lifestyle and environment, our personal susceptibility (genetic and biological variants) and a wide range of psychological effects.

In the study of Strawbridge and colleagues (2018) the goal was to identify genetic determinants of this trait. This approach has the potential to improve our understanding of impulsive behavior across different psychiatric disorders. It can also help later on to explore the possible overlap between mental illnesses and physical health.

„Would you consider yourself a risk taker?” This was the question posed to 116,255 participants, aged 40 to 69, from the UK Biobank project, a large population cohort containing a wide range of sociodemographic and medical information. Roughly one-quarter answered yes, they were the ’risk takers’ group.

A subset of participants took part in a prolonged follow-up occasion as well, where the same question was asked enabling an assessment of response consistency. Reproducibility was quite good, 81% of all participants responded consistently, 13% inconsistently, while in 6% the data was missing.

Genetic loci associated with risk-taking behavior were explored using the genome-wide association study approach. The authors identified one potential locus on chromosome 3 (CADM2) consistently, which was previously implicated in cognitive and executive functions.

Considering the entire genome using the polygenic risk score approach, the authors found, that the genetic variants that make us risk-prone also make us more likely to develop mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

This trait has not only significant positive genetic correlations with a range of mental health disorders, but also with smoking, lifetime cannabis use and body mass index (BMI). The latter implies the possibility that this finding could be followed up in a study exploring the nutritional aspects of impulsivity as well.

Overall, using dimensional approach for traits (from “normal” to pathological) rather than discrete diagnostic categories could be helpful for finding the common ground in the neurobiological underpinnings across psychiatric disorders. From this point of view, risk-taking behavior is also a complex and important phenotype for investigations.

You can find the full research article here.

Strawbridge, R. J., Ward, J., Cullen, B., Tunbridge, E. M., Hartz, S., Bierut, L., Horton, A., Bailey, M. E. S., Graham, N., Ferguson, A., Lyall, D. M., Mackay, D., Pidgeon, L. M., Cavanagh, J., Pell, J. P., O’Donovan, M., Escott-Price, V., Harrison, P. J., & Smith, D. J. (2018). Genome-wide analysis of self-reported risk-taking behaviour and cross-disorder genetic correlations in the UK Biobank cohort. Translational Psychiatry, 8. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-017-0079-1

This was co-authored by  Tünde Kilencz, a psychologist and research assistant at Semmelweis University, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in Budapest, Hungary.

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The reason why I look at impulsive behavior is because mental disorders are the single largest contributors to disease burden in Europe. Impulsivity and compulsivity increase the risk of psychiatric disorders, especially Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, alcohol and drug abuse disorders, conduct disorder and antisocial disorders (including aggression). The urgency of addressing impulsivity and compulsivity is additionally strongly supported by the fact that these problems increase the risk for mortality.

My name is Yvonne Willemsen and I have started my PhD track at Radboud University in the Netherlands in October 2017. For my project I will assess the association between nutrition, gut microbiota composition and impulsive behavior in toddlers and young adolescents. In the following paragraphs, I will explain the first study that I am currently conducting.

Many previous studies have examined the association between nutrition and executive functions. Executive functions are cognitive processes in the brain that contribute to regulating thoughts and behaviors. Executive functions can be roughly divided into three core functions, namely: inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. Inhibitory control, which can be interpreted as the opposite of impulsivity, is necessary to suppress impulses. It is also an important core function of executive functions, as it supports working memory and cognitive flexibility.  To date, studies have examined the association between nutrition and executive functions in general (1). Whether nutrition is related to inhibitory control specifically (in toddlers and young adolescents) is something that still needs to be investigated.

The next step of my study is to understand how nutrition is associated with inhibitory control. To explain a possible mechanism, we will look at the gut microbiota. The reason why the gut microbiota is a point of interest is because gut microbiota can secrete molecules that may influence brain function, and thus may influence inhibitory control (2). This connection between the gut and the brain is also known as the gut-brain axis. Gut microbiota composition can change according to nutritional intake, and can therefore play a role in the gut brain axis (3). To assess the association between nutrition, gut microbiota and behavior in toddlers and young adolescents, we will use questionnaires and different behavioural measures.

  1. Cohen, J. F. W., Gorski, M. T., Gruber, S. A., Kurdziel, L. B. F. & Rimm, E. B. The effect of healthy dietary consumption on executive cognitive functioning in children and adolescents: a systematic review. Br. J. Nutr. 116, 989–1000 (2016). Link
  2. Rogers, G. B. et al. From gut dysbiosis to altered brain function and mental illness: mechanisms and pathways. Mol. Psychiatry 21, 738–748 (2016). Link
  3. Oriach, C. S., Robertson, R. C., Stanton, C., Cryan, J. F. & Dinan, T. G. Food for thought: The role of nutrition in the microbiota-gut–brain axis. Clin. Nutr. Exp. 6, 25–38 (2016). Link
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It must have been mid-October 2017 that Oliver (8 years of age) and his family were referred to us by one of our co-workers. “Parents would like to know more about a dietary intervention for Oliver’s ADHD as opposed to medication. Oliver is falling behind at school due to attention difficulties and impulsivity. In addition to that, he has difficulty maintaining friendships and gets into fights every other day.” After screening Oliver’s behavioural problems both at home and at school, we concluded that Oliver fulfilled all inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria: he and his family were most welcome to participate in our dietary intervention at New Brain Nutrition.

Oliver’s family consists of his mother, father and younger sister Liz (6 years of age). In addition to that, his grandmother and grandfather are closely involved in raising Oliver and Liz: they take care of their grandchildren two days a week (after school). One of the major difficulties that parents had to deal with in implementing the diet was that the grandparents were somewhat sceptical about the intervention. While grandfather had this ‘Well, boys will be boys’ kind of view on Oliver’s behaviour, his grandmother was more into a ‘The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach’ perspective, which led to pampering Oliver and Liz with candy on a daily basis. This called for some extra support from our researchers (who are also clinicians) in explaining the treatment to the grandparents. Eventually, all were on the same page and well-instructed before the start of the dietary intervention.

chocolate gooey browniesAt the start, parents filled out a baseline questionnaire on the behavioural problems (i.e. hyperactivity, impulsivity, attention deficits), physical problems (i.e. headache, stomach-ache, changes in appetite) and emotional difficulties (i.e. tantrums, mood swings) that Oliver dealt with. These measures were monitored by his parents on a daily basis (on a 5-points scale) for the following five weeks. These data were collected by our dietician on a weekly basis, while the dietician also monitored their adherence. In the first week, Oliver and his grandmother made a few dietary mistakes, but from the second week onwards, all became accustomed to the dietary protocol. Oliver’s mother encouraged all family members by setting shared goals on a weekly basis. For example, if the children earned a certain amount of stickers, they would go to the swimming pool by the end of first week, to a play-farm by the end of the second week, and so on.

After three weeks, a drop in behavioural problems was seen (from an average of 5/5 at baseline to an average of 3/5 after 3 weeks), while emotional difficulties (and the related fights with peers) were diminished after three weeks (from 5/5 on average at baseline to an average of 1/5 after 3 weeks). Physical complaints were not reported (1/5 on average at both baseline and after 3 weeks). His attentional problems however remained severe (4/5 on average at both baseline and after 3 weeks).

The decrease in problems persisted until the end of the first five weeks of the dietary intervention. Since the attentional problems kept interfering with Oliver’s school performances, school provided Oliver with a noise-cancelling headset after the fifth week.

The overall results led Oliver and his family to decide to proceed with the re-introduction of eliminated foods. This however was done after the holidays (Saint Nicholas, Christmas), which parents considered too much of a challenge to combine with a strict diet. Today (mid-February), Oliver and his family are in the midst of the re-introduction of foods. Every two weeks one new product is re-introduced in bulk. Oliver’s mother turns out to be a genius in creating attractive snacks and dishes that adhere to the dietary protocol. And Oliver? He is very proud of himself for sticking to the diet!

(Editor’s note: New Brain Nutrition is conducting numerous studies on food elimination diets and other nutrition and supplement topics through 2022.  Subscribe to our blog for updates.  We look forward to sharing a lot of information and findings with you.)

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Vitamin B and ADHDThere is a well-documented relationship between dietary factors, health and human behavior. Severe malnutrition produces neurological and psychiatric symptoms. It is also assumed that dietary factors play a role in common mental disorders, such as ADHD, but this is less established and more difficult to investigate. A few studies have documented a beneficial effect of dietary interventions and vitamin supplements in ADHD in children and adults. To examine the nutritional status in ADHD, Landaas et al.(1) recently compared blood vitamin levels in 133 adult ADHD patients and 131 healthy controls. In the ADHD group there was a clear overrepresentation in the group with low levels of vitamins B2, B6 and B9.

It is yet unclear whether these vitamin levels are a) associated with ADHD symptoms, or b) whether they are the result of altered dietary intake, or c) metabolism in ADHD patients. However, it is possible that the differences reflect dietary habits that are different in a subgroup of ADHD patients and controls. Dietary habits are established early during life and may last into adulthood. It is possible that suboptimal dietary habits may precipitate, exacerbate or maintain symptoms of ADHD. More research in larger samples is obviously needed to clarify these issues. Over the next five years in our project, entitled “Effects of Nutrition and Lifestyle on Impulsive, Compulsive, and Externalizing behaviours,” we expect to gain much more insight into these connections.  We will share our findings with you.  Stay tuned!!

(1) BJPsych Open. 2016 Nov; 2(6): 377–384. Published online 2016 Dec 13. doi:  10.1192/bjpo.bp.116.003491
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5153567/ 

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