In studies about treatment for children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), it is important to use valid and reliable instruments to measure effects. A valid instrument can measure a difference in symptoms before and some time after the treatment has started. Usually questionnaires for parents and teachers are used.

In the TRACE project, currently running in the Netherlands, we are looking at the effectiveness of a dietary intervention versus care as usual, for children diagnosed with ADHD in the age group of 5-12 year old. In addition to the standard questionnaires, there is an observation instrument called the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS). This instrument was added in the TRACE project as an objective measurement for changes in behavior.

DB-DOS, ADHDThe DB-DOS was originally developed to measure disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) in preschoolers1. This way, treatment effects are not only measured in an indirect way, through information of caregivers, but also in a direct observation in the clinical setting. However, the age range of the children in the TRACE project is different from the preschoolers the DB-DOS was originally intented for. That’s why the TRACE project added several tasks to the original DB-DOS, to make sure it elicits disruptive behaviours, as well as hyperactivity and impulsivity, and to make it suitable for older children. During the current trial we try to find out if the DB-DOS is also a valid measurement for older children, aged 5-12 years.

The DB-DOS uses three different interactional contexts: parent-child context, examiner-child context and parent-examiner-child context. Children will be asked to complete different tasks. Some are rather boring, or frustrating, to see if this may elicit attention problems, hyperactivity, impulsive behaviour or disruptive behaviors. The DB-DOS contains, for example, some tasks which can evoke anger or sadness and some tasks where children get the chance to cheat. The reaction of the child is observed from behind a one-way screen. The observation lasts about 60 minutes and afterwards the observed behavior is scored by the examiner through a coding system. With more evidence-based instruments, mental health problems can be targeted more efficiently and reliably.

Our final goal is earlier interventions which prevent mental health problems in these children getting more severe and spreading through other domains such as school, work, or social contacts.

We will keep you posted about the results of the DB-DOS in the TRACE project!

REFERENCE
1 Bunte, T. L., Laschen, S., Schoemaker, K., Hessen, D. J., Van der Heijden, P. G. M., & Matthys, W. (2013). Clinical Usefulness of Observational Assessment in the Diagnosis of DBD and ADHD in Preschoolers. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 42(6), p.p. 749-761.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2013.773516

 

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