The popularity of yoga practice has risen sharply in recent years. In 2006, already 2.6 million people in Germany practiced yoga regularly (1). The arguments for yoga are widely spread in the population, for example the energy and immune function are increased and back pain, arthritis and stress are relieved (2). For others, the practice of yoga is an important factor in doing something good for themselves, while for others the discipline and control of the body is more in focus.

But, where does yoga come from?
The yoga tradition originates from India, the religion of Buddhism, and has a philosophical background with original roots reaching back over 2000 to 5000 years. The term “yoga” comes from the word “yui”, which has its origin in Sanskrit, a very ancient Indian language, and means “unite”. Accordingly, yoga refers to the union of body, mind and soul (3).

What exactly does a yoga practice involve?
In western countries the focus is especially on the Asana practice, the postures. The postures can be lying, sitting or standing and should be performed as attentively as possible. All Asanas have associated Sanskrit names and also pictorial names such as the Cobra (Bhujangasana) or the down looking dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana). Further essential elements are the breathing techniques (Pranayama), where the breath is consciously directed (e.g. Kapalabathi, alternative breathing) and the meditation (Dhyana), where the mind is consciously directed, by calming down, insight can be attained and a state of deep relaxation can be achieved.

But, can yoga really have a positive effect on mental and physical health?
In view of the study and literature available, YES! A meta-analysis results that yoga is effective as a complementary treatment for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (4).

Yoga can have a positive influence on the reduction of depression symptoms, the reduction of stress and anxiety, and can lead to an increase in self-love, awareness and life satisfaction (5, 6). On the physiological level, the results can also be found in the reduction of the stress hormone cortisol (7).

In the case of anxiety disorders, relaxation is a central component of yoga practice. Clients lack confidence, courage and stability, so that autogenic training, progressive muscle relaxation and deep relaxation can be beneficial.

In the presence of eating disorders, yoga can make an important contribution to increasing body satisfaction, awareness and receptivity as well as reducing self-objectivity and psychological symptoms (8). Prevention programs with concentration on yoga appear promising, as body satisfaction and social self-concept have been increased and bulimic symptoms reduced.

Conclusion: The integration into the health system for prevention and complementary therapy seems to be reasonable and as Mind Body Therapy, integrated into the treatment concept, positive effects on mental health can be achieved. In addition to body awareness, yoga concentrates on personal awareness and self-love and has an effect on the emotional, mental, cognitive and physical body levels. The yoga classes can be specifically adapted to the needs of the participants and can be set up in a disorder-specific way.

Advantages of yoga as a complementary therapy:
– Lower costs

– At the same time positive effect on the body
– No side effects
– Preventive and therapeutic support
– Less time required
– New contacts

What do you need to consider?
1. Choice of Yoga-Studio (atmosphere, costs, course offers)

2. Yoga teacher (e.g. education of teacher, authentic)
3. Yoga style (discover your preference, adapt to your daily state, examples follow)

– Vinyasa = flowing asanas, activating, breath and asanas in harmony
– Hatha = origin, breathing exercises, meditation, gentle asanas
– Ashtanga = powerful, always constant flowing sequences, condition
– Yin = relaxing, longer lasting asanas, calm, passive
– Acro Yoga = combination of acrobatics and yoga
– Kundalini = spiritual, mantras singing, meditation, energies

REFERENCES

  1. Klatte, R., Pabst, S., Beelmann, A. & Rosendahl, J. S. (2016). The efficacy of body-oriented yoga in mental disorders. Deutsches Arzteblatt international, 113 (20), 359. https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2016.0195.
  2. Cramer, H., Ward, L., Steel, A., Lauche, R., Dobos, G. & Zhang, Y. (2016). Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Yoga Use: Results of a U.S. Nationally Representative Survey. American journal of preventive medicine, 50 (2), 230–235.
  3. Jaquemart, P. & Elkefi, S. (1995). Yoga als Therapie. Lehrbuch für die Arzt und Naturheilpraxis. Augsburg: Weltbild Verlag.
  4. Cabral P, Meyer HB, Ames D. (2011). Effectiveness of yoga therapy as a complementary treatment for major psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13:pii: PCC10r01068.
  5. Ponte, S. B., Lino, C., Tavares, B., Amaral, B., Bettencourt, A. L., Nunes, T. et al. (2019). Yoga in primary health care. A quasi-experimental study to access the effects on quality of life and psychological distress. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 34, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.10.012
  6. Snaith, N., Schultz, T., Proeve, M. & Rasmussen, P. (2018). Mindfulness, self-compassion, anxiety and depression measures in South Australian yoga participants: implications for designing a yoga intervention. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 32, 92–99. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.05.009
  7. Bershadsky, S., Trumpfheller, L., Kimble, H. B., Pipaloff, D. & Yim, I. S. (2014). The effect of prenatal Hatha yoga on affect, cortisol and depressive symptoms. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 20 (2), 106–113. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2014.01.002
  8. Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2014). Yoga and eating disorders: is there a place for yoga in the prevention and treatment of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviours? Advances in eating disorders (Abingdon, England ), 2 (2), 136 145. https://doi.org/10.1080/21662630.2013.862369

 

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Emotion regulation difficulties, such as rumination, deficits in acceptance and problem solving, are observed in eating disorders. However, few studies have explored whether emotion regulation improves after treatment of the eating disorders, and whether difficulties in emotion regulation are different for various eating disorder types.

Eating disorder is a broad term that includes binge eating disorder, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Recently we explored emotion regulation difficulties across eating disorder types and a healthy control group without eating disorders (Study 1) and we assessed pre-treatment and post-treatment changes among the different eating disorder types (Study 2).

In Study 1, 438 adult women with eating disorders and 126 healthy women without eating disorders completed an assessment including Eating Disorders Inventory-2 and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (which assesses psychological problems and psychopathology).

In study 2, we included 69 women with eating disorders who were also reassessed after treatment. This psychological treatment was different according to the eating disorder type. On the one hand, patients with anorexia nervosa completed a day hospital treatment programme, which included daily group cognitive behavioral therapy sessions during 3 months. On the other hand, patients with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and other specified feeding or eating disorders had completed group cognitive behavioral therapy over 16-week sessions.

All eating disorder types reported worse emotion regulation compared with the control women, and differences in emotion regulation were also found between the different types of eating disorders. Especially, patients with binge-related behaviours (e.g. binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa) presented higher emotion regulation difficulties compared with patients with restrictive behaviours (i.e. anorexia nervosa restrictive subtype).

Prospective analyses (Study 2) show emotion regulation improvements after treatment, particularly in patients with bulimia nervosa, with greater improvement in those with a better treatment outcome. We also observed that changes in emotion regulation are closely linked to psychopathology and symptom severity improvement.

To sum up, emotion dysregulation is a part of all forms of eating disorders, which means that this is a transdiagnostic risk factor for the occurrence of any disorder of the eating disorder spectrum. Furthermore, emotional dysregulation can be modified. Treatments for anorexia nervosa and binge eating disorder might be enhanced by targeting emotion regulation skills.

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Recently, I participated in the Radboud Talks 2019, a scientific pitch competition, where I was lucky to be one of the eight finalists.

Why Radboud Talks? It is a perfect opportunity to share my work/ideas with the world and to gain more experience regarding presentation skills. They organized two workshops beforehand, where I had the opportunity to learn presentation techniques from professionals (actors and science communication advisors). We also received a lot of feedback, so I really learned a lot about how to present my scientific work to a general audience.

Below you can find the video from the preliminaries based on which I was chosen as a finalist. There you can hear about my research project which is about gut bacteria and their potential role in ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). ADHD is a common worldwide neurodevelopmental disorder. Every person with ADHD has a unique combination of symptoms and challenges. Importantly, it has a significant social impact on patients’ lives, causing disruption at school, work and relationships. Despite its societal importance, progress in understanding disease biology has been slow.

 

The study of the human microbiome has become a very popular topic, because of their revealed importance in human physiology and health maintenance. Numerous studies have reported that gut bacteria may have an effect on our mental health. Some studies showed a potential role of gut bacteria in a psychiatric disorder like depression, autism or Parkinson (1). Above all, diet showed to have a profound effect of ADHD symptoms. This was earlier described in this blog: https://newbrainnutrition.com/investigating-the-effects-of-a-dietary-intervention-in-adhd-on-the-brain/ and we know that diet is one of the main factors influencing gut bacteria. Taking all together, I am curious (and investigating) if gut bacteria play a role in ADHD and if yes what kind of effect do they have on ADHD symptoms.

REFERENCES:
Bastiaanssen, T., Cowan, C., Claesson, M. J., Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2018). Making Sense of … the Microbiome in Psychiatry. The international journal of neuropsychopharmacology22(1), 37–52. doi:10.1093/ijnp/pyy067

 

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In every classroom, approximately two children are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). They struggle with attention problems and hyperactive and impulsive behavior. This has negative consequences for these children. For example, they can have difficulties learning, it puts them at risk for other psychiatric problems, and it can cause parent-child relationship problems. Therefore, children with ADHD do need some sort of treatment for optimizing the quality of their lives.

After psycho-education to the child, parents and teacher, medication is often the first choice of treatment because it is evidence-based. However, there is a growing group of parents that do not wish to medicate their child. They are concerned about the side and long-term effects. Thus, these parents seek other treatment. That is where they get stuck: which other effective treatments are available?

In order to develop new treatments, there is a growing field of research focusing on risk factors for ADHD symptoms. One of these risk factors that has been studies increasingly is nutrition. Nutrition plays a role in physical well-being, but could also play a role in psychological well-being and cognitive functioning. Consequently, dietary treatments could be an alternative treatment for children with ADHD. There is a long history of research in nutrition, but there is not enough evidence yet about the cost-effectiveness to implement dietary treatments in clinical health care.

So far, studies examining the effectiveness of a so-called elimination diet showed the strongest effects (1). The aim of an elimination diet is to find out which products trigger ADHD symptoms. However, results of these studies are inconclusive because of several limitations. First, outcome measurements used in these studies were not objective. Second, studies suffered from a sample bias towards highly motivated and educated parents. Third, underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Fourth, long-term effects are unknown. Moreover, it is unknown if an elimination diet is more effective in reducing ADHD symptoms than a healthy diet based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines (2).

We thought: can we take into account these limitations ánd examine the effectiveness of two dietary treatments? This resulted in the TRACE study: ‘Treatment of ADHD with Care as usual versus an Elimination diet’ (TRACE) study. This is the first study to determine the short- and long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two dietary treatments as initial addition to care as usual as a treatment trajectory for children with ADHD. We will substantially improve upon previous studies by implementing the intervention in non-commercial mental health centers, including blinded and objective measurements, and comparing two dietary treatments with care as usual. Also, understanding the biological effects could inform clinicians to potential markers and targets for preventative or individualized treatment. For this reason, we also examine the underlying biological mechanisms (e.g. mechanisms in the gut and brain) of dietary treatments (TRACE-BIOME and TRACE-MRI studies). We collect blood, stool and saliva samples.

The TRACE study is a two-arm randomized control trial: participants are randomized to either an elimination diet or a healthy diet. The comparator arm includes children who are being treated with care as usual. Currently, we included in each dietary treatment arm about half of the targeted participants (N=81 in each dietary group). In the care as usual group, we included about one-third of the targeted participants (N=60). We hope to finish inclusion around January 2020.

I am really looking forward to the results and hope to share this with you in a couple of years! If you have any questions, feel free to contact us via trace@karakter.com

REFERENCES
(1) Nigg, J. T., Lewis, K., Edinger, T., & Falk, M. (2012). Meta-analysis of attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, restriction diet, and synthetic food color additives. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 51(1), 86-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2011. 10.015 .
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321798/

(2) Izquierdo Pulido, M. L., Ríos Hernández, A., Farran, A., & Alda, J. Á. (2015). The role of diet and physical activity in children and adolescents with ADHD. Recent Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences V, 2015, Research Signpost. Chapter 4, p. 51-64.
Link: http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/bitstream/2445/67543/1/T_1444299316Munozv%204.pdf

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Loss of appetite is among the most common side effects of stimulant for ADHD. Across studies, approximately 20% of patients with ADHD who were treated with stimulants reported a loss of appetite [1,2]. Weight loss is also quite common, as are digestive problems [3]. Together, such side effects are often referred to as “gastro-intestinal adverse events”. But why do stimulants change the way we go about eating? And what could this tell us about ADHD itself?

Appetite can arise in response to physical cues, such as an empty stomach or low blood sugar. Psychological cues can also influence our appetite; for instance, we may get hungry when we watch other people eat, or when we are bored. For most people, eating is a pleasant and rewarding activity. In the human brain, pleasure, reward, craving and, thus, appetite, have everything to do with dopamine. More specifically, with dopamine levels in the striatum, a cluster of neurons at the very base of the forebrain. The striatum is strongly connected with the prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex exercises cognitive control over the urges of the striatum: when we’re hungry, the striatum makes us crave high-caloric, high-fat, or sweet foods; at the same time, our more rational prefrontal cortex helps us make responsible food choices.

Interestingly, ADHD also has everything to do with dopamine and the striatum. Dopamine levels in the striatum are slightly ‘off’ in individuals with ADHD. As a result, people with ADHD feel a higher urge to seek pleasant experiences, and less prefrontal control over this urge. Impulsivity, a prominent feature of ADHD, can be viewed as a failure to sufficiently activate the prefrontal cortex. Finding a balance between pleasure-seeking on the one hand, and rational decision-making on the other, can be difficult for all of us. However, for people with ADHD whose dopamine balance is slightly off, making healthy, non-impulsive decisions about what to eat may be even more challenging. Indeed, overweight, obesity and diabetes seem to be more common in people with ADHD compared to people without ADHD [4].

Stimulants such as methylphenidate and dexamphetamine can restore the dopamine balance in the brain. This may result in less craving for food (as well as for other pleasant activities) and more control over impulsive urges. It is thus not very surprising that stimulant medications may cause a loss of appetite or even weight loss. Interestingly, stimulants are sometimes used to treat obesity and certain eating disorders as well. Especially for eating disorders involving impulsive eating, such as bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder, stimulant treatment could be promising. [5]

There is one other interesting angle on stimulants, dopamine, and eating. Did you know that most of the dopamine in your body is not located in the brain? In fact, a substantial proportion of all dopamine-related processes in the human body take place in the gut. Throughout the gastro-intestinal tract, dopamine receptors are abundant. Therefore, in addition to the indirect effects described above (i.e., via craving and/or impulse control), stimulants may have direct effects on eating behaviours as well. Unfortunately, we know very little about such direct effects.

REFERENCES
[1] Storebø, Ramstad, Krogh, Nilausen, Skoog, Holmskov et al. (2015). Methylphenidate for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: Cochrane systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. Cochrane Database Syst Rev (11):CD009885. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009885.pub2

[2] Storebø, Pedersen, Ramstad, Kielsholm, Nielsen, Krogh et al. (2018) Methylphenidate for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents – assessment of adverse events in non-randomised studies. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 5:CD012069. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD012069.pub2

[3] Holmskov, Storebø, Moreira-Maia, Ramstad, Magnusson, Krogh et al. (2017) Gastrointestinal adverse events during methylphenidate treatment of children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A systematic review with meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis of randomised clinical trials. PLoS One 12(6):e0178187. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178187

[4] Cortese, Moreira-Maia, St Fleur, Morcillo-Peñalver, Rohde & Faraone (2016). Association Between ADHD and Obesity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Am J Psychiatry 173(1):34-43. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2015.15020266

[5] Himmerich & Treasure (2018). Psychopharmacological advances in eating disorders. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol, 11(1):95-108. doi: 10.1080/17512433.2018.1383895

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Cigarette smoking may give immediate pleasure but is dangerous for your health. Smoking may be seen as a way to deal with feelings like anxiety and stress and may be viewed as a way of coping with everyday life. Smoking a cigarette may also be used as a reward, and as part of a celebration of big and small victories. But what happens to your mental well-being if you quit smoking?

Smoke cessation is one of the best things, if not the best, you can do for your health! Smoking is ranked as the second leading cause of death by a body called “the Global Burden of Disease 2017 Risk Factor Collaborators”.1 Quitting smoking lowers your risk of cardiovascular diseases and your risk of cancer. 2 But does this come at a price concerning your mental health – how is that impacted by quitting smoking?

A systematic review of 26 studies assessing mental health before and after smoking cessation found that quitting was associated with mental health benefits. 3 Assessment of mental health were made both in the general population and in clinical populations, including persons with physical or psychiatric conditions. In the included studies, the assessment of mental status at least 6 weeks after cessation was compared with the baseline assessment. Smoking cessation was associated with improvements in levels of anxiety, depression, stress and psychological quality of life. The authors point to clinicians to recommend smoking cessation interventions also among smokers with mental health problems.

There are several aides to be used by smoke quitters. These span from brief advice to nicotine replacement therapy. How do you get help for smoking cessation? Talk to your doctor about it! And don’t give up if you fail at a quit attempt! Each attempt will bring you closer to the status “former smoker”.

REFERENCES:

  1. Collaborators GBDRF. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Lancet 2018;392:1923-94.
  2. https://www.who.int/tobacco/quitting/benefits/en/
  3. Taylor G, McNeill A, Girling A, Farley A, Lindson-Hawley N, Aveyard P. Change in mental health after smoking cessation: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2014;348:g1151. https://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g1151

 

 

 

 

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We have discussed the association between ADHD and obesity in our first blog (https://newbrainnutrition.com/adhd-and-obesity-does-one-cause-the-other/), briefly summarized, evidence from various study designs suggested that shared etiological factors might contribute to the above association. Recently, a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) on risk genes for ADHD reported a significant genetic correlation between ADHD and a higher risk of overweight and obesity, increased BMI, and higher waist-to-hip ratio, which further supported that there could be genetic overlap between obesity and ADHD (1).

Considering the previously described occurrence of unhealthy dietary intake in children and adolescents with ADHD in our second blog (https://newbrainnutrition.com/unhealthy-diets-and-food-addictions-in-adhd/), along with the fact that bad eating behaviours are crucial factors for the development of obesity, We can speculate that the shared genetic effects between ADHD and unhealthy dietary intake may also explain the potential bidirectional diet-ADHD associations. Is there any available evidence to support the above hypothesis?

To date, dopaminergic dysfunctions underpinning reward deficiency processing (or neural reward anticipation), was reported as a potential shared biological mechanism, through which the genetic variants could increase both the risk for ADHD and unhealthy dietary intake or obesity. Via the Gut-Brain axis, a two-way and high-speed connection, the gut can talk to the brain directly. According to the study (2), a higher proportion of bacteria that produce a substance that can be converted into dopamine was found in the intestines of people with ADHD than those without ADHD. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), they further found that the participants with more of these bacteria in their intestines displayed less activity in the reward sections of the brain, which constitutes one of the hallmarks of ADHD. We are therefore proposing the idea that there could be a biological pathway- ‘dietary habits-gut (microorganism)-reward system (dopamine)-ADHD’, through which the shared genetic effects between ADHD and unhealthy dietary intake may play a role.

In order to determine whether the genetic overlap between ADHD and dietary habits actually exists, we will in our next Eat2beNice project use twin methodology and unique data from the Swedish Twin Register. We will keep you updated!

This was co-authored by Henrik Larsson, professor in the School of Medical Science, Örebro University and Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.

Authors:
Lin Li, MSc, PhD student in the School of Medical Science, Örebro University, Sweden.

Henrik Larsson, PhD, professor in the School of Medical Science, Örebro University and Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.

REFERENCES:
1. Demontis D, Walters RK, Martin J, Mattheisen M, Als TD, Agerbo E, et al. Discovery of the first genome-wide significant risk loci for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Nature genetics. 2019;51(1):63.

2. Aarts E, Ederveen TH, Naaijen J, Zwiers MP, Boekhorst J, Timmerman HM, et al. Gut microbiome in ADHD and its relation to neural reward anticipation. PLoS One. 2017;12(9):e0183509.

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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with an estimated prevalence rate of 5.3% among children and of about 2.5% among adults. It is characterized by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity, being associated with significant impairment of social, academic, and occupational functioning across the lifespan.

However, despite many efforts, the exact etiology of ADHD still remains unknown and data about modificable risk and protective factors are largely lacking. Recent evidence has suggested an association between inflammation, immunological disturbances and ADHD. Supporting this idea, an increased incidence of immune-mediated disorders (e.g. asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, allergic conjunctivitis, psoriasis, thyrotoxicosis or type 1 diabetes) accompanied by elevated serum/plasma and cerebrospinal levels of inflammatory markers (especially interleukin (IL)-6) or auto-antibody levels (e.g. antibasal ganglia antibodies, antibodies against the dopamine transporter) have been found in these patients.

Importantly, recent studies have shown the gut flora as an important immunoregulator (1-3) and it is hypothesized that an imbalance in the gut microbiota (dysbiosis) may have a negative effect on cerebral development and behavior (4). About 95% of all circulating serotonin, dopamine or noradrenaline precursors are produced by our gut microbiota, being this ‘enteric nervous system’ bidirectional connected to the central nervous system through hormonal or immune/inflammatory pathways.

In line with this, recent findings suggest that some aliments as probiotics can not only revert dysbiosis, but also modulate brain neurodevelopment, activity and improve cognition, mood and behavior due to their immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties (5-7).

Therefore, understanding the microbiota and how the gut connects to the brain would be important both for the better comprehension of the biological bases that underlie some psychiatric disorders such as ADHD, as for the future development of new evidenced-based drugs for these conditions.

This was co-authored by Josep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, MD PhD psychiatrist and Head of Department of Psychiatry at Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona, Spain. He is also professor at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

REFERENCES:

1. Felix KM, Tahsin S, Wu HJ. Host-microbiota interplay in mediating immune disorders. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2018; 1417(1):57-70.

2. Yadav SK, Boppana S, Ito N, Mindur JE, Mathay MT, Patel A, et al. Gut dysbiosis breaks immunological tolerance toward the central nervous system during young adulthood. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.2017; 114(44): E9318-27.

3. Mandl T, Marsal J, Olsson P, Ohlsson B, Andreasson K. Severe intestinal dysbiosis is prevalent in primary Sjögren’s syndrome and is associated with systemic disease activity. Arthritis Res Ther.2017;19(1):237.

4. Rogers GB, Keating DJ, Young RL, Wong ML, Licinio J, Wesselingh S. From gut dysbiosis to altered brain function and mental illness: mechanisms and pathways. Mol Psychiatry. 2016; 21(6):738-48.

5. Slykerman RF, Kang J, Van Zyl N, Barthow C, Wickens K, Stanley T, et al. Effect of early probiotic supplementation on childhood cognition, behavior and mood. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Acta Paediatr.2018; 107(12):2172-78.

6. Kane L, Kinzel J. The effects of probiotics on mood and emotion. JAAPA. 2018; 31(5):1-3.

7. Mayer EA. Gut feelings: the emerging biology of gut-brain communication. Nat Rev Neurosci.2011;12(8):453-66

 

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Our body is colonized by trillions of microorganisms that are important for vital processes. Gut microbiota are the microorganisms living in the intestinal gut and play an essential role in digestion, vitamin synthesis and metabolism, among others. The mouth and the large intestine contain the vast majority of gut microbiota whether the stomach only contains few thousands of microorganisms, especially due to the acidity of its fluids. Microbiota composition is constantly changing, affecting the well-being and health of the individual.

Each individual has a unique microbiota composition, and it depends on several factors including diet, diseases, medication and also the genetics of the individual (host) (Figure). Some medicines, especially antibiotics, reduce bacterial diversity. Strong and broad spectrum antibiotics can have longer effects on gut microbiota, some of them up to several years. Genetic variation of an individual also affects the microbiota composition, and the abundance of certain microorganisms is partly genetically determined by the host.

The main contributor to gut microbiota diversity is diet, accounting for 57% of variation. Several studies have demonstrated that diet’s composition has a direct impact on gut microbiota. For example, an study performed on mice showed that “Western diet” (high-fat and sugar diet), alters the composition of microbiota in just one day! On the other hand, vegetarian and calorie restricted diet can also have an effect on gut microbiota composition.

Prebiotics and probiotics are diet strategies more used to control and reestablish the gut microbiota and improve the individual’s health. Probiotics are non-pathogenic microorganisms used as food ingredients (e.g. lactobacillus present in yoghurt) and prebiotics are indigestible food material (e.g. fibers in raw garlic, asparagus and onions), which are nutrients to increase the growth of beneficial microorganisms.

In the last years the new term psychobiotics has been introduced to define live bacteria with beneficial effects on mental health. Psychobiotics are of particular interest for improving the symptomatology of psychiatric disorders and recent preclinical trials have show promising results, particularly in stress, anxiety and depression.

Overall, these approaches are appealing because they can be introduced in food and drink and therefore provide a relatively non-invasive method of manipulating the microbiota.

AUTHORS:
Judit Cabana-Domínguez and Noèlia Fernàndez-Castillo

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Download your FREE REPORT

How do you eat in a healthy fashion?  Anne Siegl, PhD writes that a big part about eating healthy is nutritional diversity.  Not eating the same thing every day, but providing your body with a rich variety of all kinds of foods and nutrients.  Part of our objective is to keep our gut happy, because our gut drives so much of our health.  And we are discovering that the gut is in continual high-speed two-way communication with the brain.  If the bacteria (microbiota) in your gut are happy, you will lead a more healthy physical life, and we are learning, a more healthy mental life as well.  We are one organism, and it’s all connected.  Keep your gut microbiota healthy with a varied diet.

Download this important report today.

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This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 728018

New Brain Nutrition is a project and brand of Eat2BeNice, a consortium of 18 European University Hospitals throughout the continent.

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