Assessing someone’s diet can be tricky and particularly time-consuming. People choose from millions of groceries every day, and the vast range of products available adds a further level of complexity to accurately assessing diet. Traditionally, dietary research is based on food diaries, meaning participants keep record of what they eat and drink by writing it down on paper. To extract nutritional information, researchers have to input the paper-based data into nutrient analysis software by hand, which is extremely time-consuming and error-prone. Furthermore, each country has local and distinct food products to offer. These differences need to be considered when assessing nutritional intake in an international project such as New Brain Nutrition.

Faced with these difficulties we are delighted to announce the use of the online 24-h dietary assessment tool “Measure Your Food On One Day (myfood24)” at the University Hospital in Frankfurt for our project. The study aims to investigate the effects of exercise and nutrition on behavioural measures regarding impulsive, compulsive and externalising behaviours.

myfood24 is a quick and easy online dietary assessment tool that tracks, monitors, and analyses dietary intake.

myfood24 is based on a novel approach to assess food intake through technology.

A collaborative project between the University of Leeds (PI Prof Janet Cade) and Imperial College London recognized the need for a valid, reliable, low burden and user-friendly dietary assessment tool. Funded by a UK Medical Research Council grant, the team of experts developed and tested myfood24 for a wide range of age groups including adolescents, adults and older adults and validated myfood24 against a suite of biomarkers.

Participants enter all the foods and drinks they have consumed during one day (from midnight to midnight) into the online tool. They can choose from an extensive range of food items including generic foods (e.g. milk chocolate) and branded products (e.g. milka & daim chocolate). Food portion images are available for a variety of items to help quantify consumed foods. myfood24 is easy to use with no training required; it can also be interviewer-administered. These features help to maximise participation throughout the research project and to cater to a wide range of research project types, study participants and clinical needs.

The academic rigor, automated data processing, and immediate production of results contribute to improved data quality and a drastic time reduction.

myfood24 has 4 country-specific versions available: United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and Australia. These include localised food databases and translations.

A teaching version is also available in the United Kingdom; it has been tailored to a classroom situation and allows for immediate feedback from the whole class to be explored together (without aggregating information elsewhere). Feedback includes a variety of visual and easy-to-interpret graphs at both the individual and group level and includes over 100 different nutrients. myfood24 has wide application in research, teaching and health settings, globally.

Click here to try a free demo of myfood24.

Further information on myfood24 can be found on the myfood24 website.

myfood24 was developed through Medical Research Council funding, grant G110235 by a collaborative project between the University of Leeds (PI Prof Janet Cade) and Imperial College, London. Requests to use myfood24 should be made to enquiries@myfood24.org

Please share and like us:

As described in my previous blog post (Nutrition, Gut Microbiota and Behavior, 4th of April), I will investigate the association between nutrition, gut microbiota and behavior. One of the main focuses within my research is to investigate the association between early life nutrition, gut microbiota development and inhibitory control within toddlers and pubertal children.

The first 1000 days of life (starting from conception) were shown to be a critical window for child development. In this phase, nutritional intake of the infant can stimulate the body and brain towards a healthy development, also known as nutritional programming1. Hence, early life nutrition, i.e. breastfeeding, can exert a major influence on infant development and thus future behavior. Breast milk contains many beneficial components such as sugars, immune factors and bacteria which are difficult to process in bottle formulas. Thus, exclusive breastfeeding is recommended until six months of age in the Netherlands.breastfeeding and early nutrition

Several studies have looked at the association between infant breastfeeding duration and future executive functioning. (Executive functions are cognitive processes in the brain that contribute to regulating thoughts and behaviors. Executive functions can be roughly divided into three core functions, namely: inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. Inhibitory control, which can be interpreted as the opposite of impulsivity, is necessary to suppress impulses.) Two studies found positive associations with breastfeeding duration and executive functioning in childhood2,3. However, some studies have found no associations between infant breastfeeding and future executive functioning 4,5. These studies have examined general executive functioning and mainly focussed on attention, and not inhibitory control. Furthermore, different ages and populations were examined which makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the association between breastfeeding duration and future executive functioning. Thus, it is of particular interest whether inhibitory control is association with breastfeeding duration.

In addition, previous literature has focused mostly on duration of breastfeeding, while the composition of breast milk is also of major importance. Breastmilk contains many nutrients that are finely attuned to the needs of the infant. It contains biologically active compounds which have diverse roles, among others guiding the development of the infant’s intestinal microbiota6. Breast milk also contains specific sugars, also known as human oligosaccharides, which have been shown to influence the types of microbiota colonizing in the infant gut7. This may potentially be associated with impulsive behaviour8. Thus, in addition to examining breastfeeding duration in relation to inhibitory control, I will also examine the breastmilk composition in relation to inhibitory control.

  1. Agosti, M., Tandoi, F., Morlacchi, L. & Bossi, A. Nutritional and metabolic programming during the first thousand days of life. La Pediatr. Medica e Chir. 39, (2017).
  2. Hayatbakhsh, M. R., O’Callaghan, M. J., Bor, W., Williams, G. M. & Najman, J. M. Association of Breastfeeding and Adolescents’ Psychopathology: A Large Prospective Study. Breastfeed. Med. 7, 480–486 (2012).
  3. Julvez, J. et al. Attention behaviour and hyperactivity at age 4 and duration of breast-feeding. Acta Paediatr. 96, 842–847 (2007).
  4. Belfort, M. B. et al. Infant Breastfeeding Duration and Mid-Childhood Executive Function, Behavior, and Social-Emotional Development. J. Dev. Behav. Pediatr. 37, 43–52 (2016).
  5. Groen-Blokhuis, M. M. et al. A prospective study of the effects of breastfeeding and FADS2 polymorphisms on cognition and hyperactivity/attention problems. Am. J. Med. Genet. Part B Neuropsychiatr. Genet. 162, 457–465 (2013).
  6. Andreas, N. J., Kampmann, B. & Mehring Le-Doare, K. Human breast milk: A review on its composition and bioactivity. Early Hum. Dev. 91, 629–635 (2015).
  7. Lewis, Z. T. et al. Maternal fucosyltransferase 2 status affects the gut bifidobacterial communities of breastfed infants. Microbiome 3, 13 (2015).

 

 

Please share and like us: