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Increasing evidence is showing that the gut microbiota can alter the brain and behavior, and thus may play a role in the development of psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia.

Animal models are a useful tool to study this mechanism. For example, germ-free (GF) mice, which have never been exposed to microorganisms, are compared with mice exposed to microorganisms, known as conventional colonized mice (CC). Recent studies have schizophrenia and autismreported that GF animals show increased response to stress, as well as reduced anxiety and memory. In most cases, these alterations are restricted to males, in which there are higher incidence rates of neurodevelopmental disorders compared with females.

Mice, like humans, are a social species and are used to study social behavior. A recent study compared GF and CC mice using different sociability tests. GF mice showed impairments in social behavior compared with CC mice, particularly in males. Interestingly, they demonstrate that social deficits can be reversed by bacterial colonization of  the GF gut (GFC), achieving normal social behavior.

Microbiota seem to be crucial for social behaviors, including social motivation and preference for social novelty. Microbiota also regulate repetitive behaviors, characteristic of several disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

Bacterial colonization can change brain function and behavior, suggesting that microbial-based interventions in later life could improve social impairments and be a useful tool to effect the symptoms of these disorders.

This blog was co-authored by Noèlia Fernàndez and Judit Cabana

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About the author

Judit Cabana Dominguez, PhD does research in the Department of Genetics, Microbiology & Statistics, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

About Noelia Fernandez Castillo, PhD and Judit Cabana Dominguez, PhD


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