Feeling more happy after a run? Or feeling a bit blue during the dark winter days? Regular exercising and regular daylight exposure can influence your mood, behaviour and sleep-wake cycle 1,2,3. But can this also be used in a therapeutical setting, for instance in addition to or instead of the usual treatment with medication?

The PROUD trial aims to investigate the potential of bright light therapy and physical exercise to improve and prevent depression and obesity in adolescents and young adults with ADHD. This clinical trial is part of the CoCA research project, in which comorbid conditions of ADHD are investigated [insert hyperlink: https://coca-project.eu/coca-phase-iia-trial/study/]. In addition, we collect the stool samples of all participants in order to investigate the effects of physical exercise on the gut microbiome and how this is linked to behaviour. That part of the study is part of the Eat2beNICE research project.

Most people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) receive medication to reduce their symptoms4. While this medication works well for many people, there is a lot of interest in other types of treatment. One reason for this is that people with ADHD suffer from additional conditions, such as depression5 and obesity6. The risk for developing these comorbid conditions is especially high during adolescence and young adulthood4.

Adolescents and young adults (age 14-45) with ADHD that want to participate are randomly assigned to one of three groups: 10-weeks of daily light therapy (30 minutes), 10-weeks of daily physical exercise (3x per day) or 10-week care as usual (for instance, the normal medication). The random assignment is very important here in order to compare the different interventions. We don’t want to have all people that like sports in the physical exercise group, because then we don’t know if the effects of the physical exercise are due to the intervention, or due to the fact that these people just like sports better.

Another nice feature of the study is that it uses a phone app (called m-Health). This app is used to remind the participants to do their exercise or light therapy, but it also gives feedback and summaries of how the participant is doing. The app is linked to a wrist sensor that measures activity and light.

The clinical trial is currently ongoing in London (England), Nijmegen (Netherlands), Frankfurt (Germany) and Barcelona (Spain). We can’t look at the results until the end of the trial, so for those we will need to wait until 2021. But in the mean time the PROUD-researchers have interviewed four participants. You can read these interviews here:

This blog is based on the blog “10 weeks of physical exercise or light therapy: what’s it like to participate in our clinical trial?” by Jutta Mayer and Adam Pawley, 9 Oct. 2018 on MiND the Gap – https://mind-the-gap.live/2018/10/09/10-weeks-of-physical-exercise-or-light-therapy/

REFERENCES

  1. Terman, M. Evolving applications of light therapy. Sleep Medicine Reviews. 2007; 11(6): 497-507.
  2. Stanton, R. & Reaburn, P. Exercise and the treatment of depression: A review of the exercise program variables. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2014; 17(2):177-182
  3. Youngstedt, S.D. Effects of exercise on sleep. Clinical Sports Medicine. 2005; 24(2):355-365.
  4. Cortese S, Adamo N, Del Giovane C, Mohr-Jensen C, Hayes AJ, Carucci S, et al. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of medications for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, adolescents, and adults: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Lancet Psychiatry. 2018;5(9):727-738.
  5. Jacob CP, Romanos J, Dempfle A, Heine M, Windemuth-Kieselbach C, Kruse A, et al. Co-morbidity of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with focus on personality traits and related disorders in a tertiary referral center. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2007;257:309–17.
  6. Cortese S, Moreira-Maia CR, St Fleur D, Morcillo-Penalver C, Rohde LA, Faraone SV. Association between ADHD and obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Psychiatry. 2016;173:34–43.
  7. Meinzer MC, Lewinsohn PM, Pettit JW, Seeley JR, Gau JM, Chronis-Tuscano A, et al. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adolescence predicts onset of major depressive disorder through early adulthood. Depress Anxiety. 2013;30:546–53
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What is inflammation?

Inflammation is the response of the body’s immune system against external factors that can put your health in danger. When this system feels it is attacked by something that may harm your health, it activates some molecules that are called cytokines in order to neutralize or avoid any damage so you can be safe.

Why is inflammation bad? What does it do?

Inflammation isn’t bad by itself, since its purpose is to protect our body. In some cases however, when the duration of this response is extended for too long- I’m talking about years- it can cause harmful effects to your health. Especially, it can affect the brain by active transport of cytokines throughout this organ.

Neuro-inflammation may occur if this process continues past early stages. Neuro-inflammation plays an important role in the development of mental diseases such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder (BD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), where elevated levels of inflammation have been found(1).

What causes inflammation? 

Inflammation can occur by different factors. Some of them could be: pathogens, injuries, chronic stress, and diseases like dermatitis, cystitis or bronchitis to mention a few.

Nutritional factors like overweight and poor diet quality can also trigger this process by increasing fat accumulation in our cells and damaging them (2). The exact mechanisms that are involved in these processes are still in research.

What decreases inflammation?

Research has found that adhering to a healthy diet, like the Mediterranean diet, characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, lean meats and nuts, can decrease inflammation and protect you against depressive symptoms and anxiety (3,4).

There is evidence that prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics (a combination of prebiotics and probiotics) can also help lowering inflammation. In addition, you should avoid eating pro-inflammatory foods that have been found to increase the risk of inflammation, and with it mental disorders. Some of these are refined carbohydrates, beverages with a lot of sugar added like soda, juice and sports drinks, processed meat and foods high in saturated fats (5).

What are anti-inflammatory foods

Anti-inflammatory foods are the contrast of pro-inflammatory foods. These are foods that have been found to promote or induce low levels of inflammation in our body, which may protect us against neurological disorders. Briefly, these foods include fruits, vegetables, olive oil, fish and spices like curcuma (turmeric).

Here’s what YOU can do to minimize inflammation and improve your mental health.

Inflammation and Foods

This was co-authored by Josep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, MD PhD psychiatrist and Head of Department of Psychiatry at Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona, Spain. He is also professor at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Sources

  1. Mitchell RHB, Goldstein BI. Inflammation in children and adolescents with neuropsychiatric disorders: A systematic review. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry [Internet]. Elsevier Inc; 2014;53(3):274–96. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2013.11.013
  2. Ogłodek EA, Just MJ. The Association between Inflammatory Markers (iNOS, HO-1, IL-33, MIP-1β) and Depression with and without Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Pharmacol Reports [Internet]. 2018;70:1065–72. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1734114017305923
  3. Lassale C, Batty GD, Baghdadli A, Jacka F, Sánchez-Villegas A, Kivimäki M, et al. Healthy dietary indices and risk of depressive outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Mol Psychiatry [Internet]. Springer US; 2018;1. Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41380-018-0237-8
  4. Phillips CM, Shivappa N, Hébert JR, Perry IJ. Dietary inflammatory index and mental health: A cross-sectional analysis of the relationship with depressive symptoms, anxiety and well-being in adults. Clin Nutr. 2017;37.
  5. Shivappa N, Bonaccio M, Hebert JR, Di Castelnuovo A, Costanzo S, Ruggiero E, et al. Association of proinflammatory diet with low-grade inflammation: results from the Moli-sani study. Nutrition. 2018;54:182–8.

 

 

 

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