Recently I had a great chance to participate in the 19th WPA World Congress of Psychiatry which took place in Lisbon 21-24 of August 2019. Such an international scientific event summarizes recent findings and sets a trend for future research.

The effect of lifestyle on mental health was one of the topics discussed at the conference. Focusing on nutritional impact in psychiatry I will review here some of the studies – research done in animal models or patients and literature reviews – which were presented at the Congress.

All the poster presentations can be viewed on the conference website https://2019.wcp-congress.com/.

Dietary patterns and mental health

  1. Sanchez-Villegas and colleagues from Spain1 presented research on the Mediterranean diet’s effects in patients recovered from depressive disorders. They found that adherence to Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil led to the improvement of depressive symptoms. This new study supports previous reports about positive effects of traditional dietary patterns compared to so-called “Western diet”, and this topic was nicely reviewed in the poster presentation of M. Jesus and colleagues (Portugal)2.

I presented a poster3 on a study done in a mouse model of Western diet feeding. We found that genetic deficiency of serotonin transporter exacerbates metabolic alterations and such behavioural consequences of the Western diet as depressive-like behaviour and cognitive impairment. In human, carriers of a genetic variant that reduces serotonin transporter expression are known to be more susceptible to emotionality-related disorders and prone to obesity and diabetes.

Vitamin D and Mental Health

Nutritional psychiatry was traditionally focused on the effects of vitamins and micronutrients on mental health. Several presentations at this conference were dedicated to the role of vitamin D in mental disorders.

Scientists from Egypt (T. Okasha and colleagues)4 showed their results on the correlation between serum level of vitamin D and two psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia and depression. They found lower serum vitamin D levels in the patients with schizophrenia or depression compared to healthy volunteers. These findings indicate a role of vitamin D in the development of psychiatric disorders.

However, the team from Denmark (J. Hansen and colleagues)5 did not find any effect of 3 months vitamin D supplementation on depression symptoms in patients with major depression. The contrariety of the studies on vitamin D benefits in mental health was presented on the review poster by R. Avelar and colleagues (Portugal)6.

Microbiome and Mental Health

There is increasing evidence that microbiota-gut-brain axis influences behaviour and mental health. N. Watanabe and colleagues (Japan)7 presented the results of a study on germfree and commensal microbiota-associated mice. They found increased aggression and impaired brain serotonin metabolism in germfree mice.

  1. Dias and colleagues (Portugal)8 performed a literature review on this topic exploring possible effects of microbiome and probiotics in mental disorder development. The most robust evidence was found for the association of microbiome alterations and depression/anxiety. Up to date literature is lacking replicated findings on proving positive effects of probiotics in mental disorders treatment.

Diabetes Type 2 and Mental Disorders

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include diet and lifestyle habits. It is getting more obvious that there is an association between type 2 diabetes and the development of mental disorders.

  1. Mhalla and colleagues (Tunisia)9 reported a study done on patients with type 2 diabetes. They found a high prevalence of depression in women with type 2 diabetes. Also, depression in these patients was associated with poorer glycemic control.

Depression is an important factor influencing insomnia. H.C. Kim (Republic of Korea)10 found insomnia in one-third of patients with diabetes type 2.

The group from Romania (A. Ciobanu and colleagues)11 created a meta-analysis of the medical literature showing an association of diabetes type 2 with Alzheimer’s disease. They highlighted the role of insulin signaling in cognition and proposed glucose blood level control as a therapeutic approach in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Thus, a lot of studies were recently done on the role of nutrition in psychiatric disorders development and therapy. However, there is still room for future discoveries!

REFERENCES:
From 19th WPA World Congress of Psychiatry proceedings:

  1. Sanchez-Villegas, B. Cabrera-Suárez, M. Santos Burguete, P. Molero, A. González-Pinto, C. Chiclana, J. Hernández-Fleta. INTERVENTION WITH MEDITERRANEAN DIET IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS IN PATIENTS RECOVERED FROM DEPRESSIVE DISORDER. PREDI-DEP TRIAL PRELIMINARY RESULTS;
  2. Jesus, C. Cagigal, T. Silva, V. Martins, C. Silva. DIETARY PATTERNS AND THEIR INFLUENCE IN DEPRESSION;
  3. Veniaminova, A. Gorlova, J. Hebert, D. Radford-Smith, R. Cespuglio, A. Schmitt-Boehrer, K. Lesch, D. Anthony, T. Strekalova. THE ROLE OF GENETIC SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER DEFICIENCY IN CONSEQUENCES OF EXPOSURE TO THE WESTERN DIET: A STUDY IN MICE;
  4. Okasha, W. Sabry, M. Hashim, A. Abdelrahman. VITAMIN D SERUM LEVEL AND ITS CORRELATION WITH MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER AND SCHIZOPHRENIA;
  5. Hansen, M. Pareek, A. Hvolby, A. Schmedes, T. Toft, E. Dahl, C. Nielsen7, P. Schulz8. VITAMIN D3 SUPPLEMENTATION AND TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH DEPRESSION;
  6. Avelar, D. Guedes, J. Velosa, F. Passos, A. Delgado, A. Corbal Luengo, M. Heitor. VITAMIN D AND MENTAL HEALTH: A BRIEF REVIEW;
  7. Watanabe, K. Mikami, K. Keitaro, F. Akama, Y. Aiba, K. Yamamoto, H. Matsumoto. INFLUENCE OF COMMENSAL MICROBIOTA ON AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIORS;
  8. Dias, I. Figueiredo, F. Ferreira, F. Viegas, C. Cativo, J. Pedro, T. Ferreira, N. Santos, T. Maia. EMOTIONAL GUT: THE RELATION BETWEEN GUT MICROBIOME AND MENTAL HEALTH;
  9. Mhalla, M. Jabeur, H. Mhalla, C. Amrouche, H. Ounaissa, F. Zaafrane3, L. Gaha. DEPRESSION IN ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES: PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS;
  10. Kim. FACTORS RELATED TO INSOMNIA IN TYPE 2 DIABETICS;
  11. A. Ciobanu, L. Catrinescu2, C. Neagu3, I. Dumitru3. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND DIABETES

 

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This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 728018

New Brain Nutrition is a project and brand of Eat2BeNice, a consortium of 18 European University Hospitals throughout the continent.

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