The popularity of yoga practice has risen sharply in recent years. In 2006, already 2.6 million people in Germany practiced yoga regularly (1). The arguments for yoga are widely spread in the population, for example the energy and immune function are increased and back pain, arthritis and stress are relieved (2). For others, the practice of yoga is an important factor in doing something good for themselves, while for others the discipline and control of the body is more in focus.

But, where does yoga come from?
The yoga tradition originates from India, the religion of Buddhism, and has a philosophical background with original roots reaching back over 2000 to 5000 years. The term “yoga” comes from the word “yui”, which has its origin in Sanskrit, a very ancient Indian language, and means “unite”. Accordingly, yoga refers to the union of body, mind and soul (3).

What exactly does a yoga practice involve?
In western countries the focus is especially on the Asana practice, the postures. The postures can be lying, sitting or standing and should be performed as attentively as possible. All Asanas have associated Sanskrit names and also pictorial names such as the Cobra (Bhujangasana) or the down looking dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana). Further essential elements are the breathing techniques (Pranayama), where the breath is consciously directed (e.g. Kapalabathi, alternative breathing) and the meditation (Dhyana), where the mind is consciously directed, by calming down, insight can be attained and a state of deep relaxation can be achieved.

But, can yoga really have a positive effect on mental and physical health?
In view of the study and literature available, YES! A meta-analysis results that yoga is effective as a complementary treatment for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (4).

Yoga can have a positive influence on the reduction of depression symptoms, the reduction of stress and anxiety, and can lead to an increase in self-love, awareness and life satisfaction (5, 6). On the physiological level, the results can also be found in the reduction of the stress hormone cortisol (7).

In the case of anxiety disorders, relaxation is a central component of yoga practice. Clients lack confidence, courage and stability, so that autogenic training, progressive muscle relaxation and deep relaxation can be beneficial.

In the presence of eating disorders, yoga can make an important contribution to increasing body satisfaction, awareness and receptivity as well as reducing self-objectivity and psychological symptoms (8). Prevention programs with concentration on yoga appear promising, as body satisfaction and social self-concept have been increased and bulimic symptoms reduced.

Conclusion: The integration into the health system for prevention and complementary therapy seems to be reasonable and as Mind Body Therapy, integrated into the treatment concept, positive effects on mental health can be achieved. In addition to body awareness, yoga concentrates on personal awareness and self-love and has an effect on the emotional, mental, cognitive and physical body levels. The yoga classes can be specifically adapted to the needs of the participants and can be set up in a disorder-specific way.

Advantages of yoga as a complementary therapy:
– Lower costs
– At the same time positive effect on the body
– No side effects
– Preventive and therapeutic support
– Less time required
– New contacts

What do you need to consider?
1. Choice of Yoga-Studio (atmosphere, costs, course offers)
2. Yoga teacher (e.g. education of teacher, authentic)
3. Yoga style (discover your preference, adapt to your daily state, examples follow)

– Vinyasa = flowing asanas, activating, breath and asanas in harmony
– Hatha = origin, breathing exercises, meditation, gentle asanas
– Ashtanga = powerful, always constant flowing sequences, condition
– Yin = relaxing, longer lasting asanas, calm, passive
– Acro Yoga = combination of acrobatics and yoga
– Kundalini = spiritual, mantras singing, meditation, energies

REFERENCES

  1. Klatte, R., Pabst, S., Beelmann, A. & Rosendahl, J. S. (2016). The efficacy of body-oriented yoga in mental disorders. Deutsches Arzteblatt international, 113 (20), 359. https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2016.0195.
  2. Cramer, H., Ward, L., Steel, A., Lauche, R., Dobos, G. & Zhang, Y. (2016). Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Yoga Use: Results of a U.S. Nationally Representative Survey. American journal of preventive medicine, 50 (2), 230–235.
  3. Jaquemart, P. & Elkefi, S. (1995). Yoga als Therapie. Lehrbuch für die Arzt und Naturheilpraxis. Augsburg: Weltbild Verlag.
  4. Cabral P, Meyer HB, Ames D. (2011). Effectiveness of yoga therapy as a complementary treatment for major psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13:pii: PCC10r01068.
  5. Ponte, S. B., Lino, C., Tavares, B., Amaral, B., Bettencourt, A. L., Nunes, T. et al. (2019). Yoga in primary health care. A quasi-experimental study to access the effects on quality of life and psychological distress. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 34, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.10.012
  6. Snaith, N., Schultz, T., Proeve, M. & Rasmussen, P. (2018). Mindfulness, self-compassion, anxiety and depression measures in South Australian yoga participants: implications for designing a yoga intervention. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 32, 92–99. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.05.009
  7. Bershadsky, S., Trumpfheller, L., Kimble, H. B., Pipaloff, D. & Yim, I. S. (2014). The effect of prenatal Hatha yoga on affect, cortisol and depressive symptoms. Complementary therapies in clinical practice, 20 (2), 106–113. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2014.01.002
  8. Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2014). Yoga and eating disorders: is there a place for yoga in the prevention and treatment of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviours? Advances in eating disorders (Abingdon, England ), 2 (2), 136 145. https://doi.org/10.1080/21662630.2013.862369

 

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Why do some people have a higher craving for carbohydrate-rich and junk-food than others? Why are weight-loss programs more effective in some individuals than others? And why are some people more physically active?

The dopamine system in the brain plays an important role in regulating how much you eat and whether or not you gain weight. When this system does not function optimally, people have a higher craving for junk-food, lower physical activity, and unsuccessful body weight control.

There are two mechanisms that determine food-related behaviour.

The more direct, homeostatic, mechanism constantly surveys the body’s energetic needs and holds them actively in balance. That is homeo-stasis.

The second non-homeostatic mechanism determines the way humans, and other animals, react to food: how willingly and often they will consume it again, and whether they feel anticipation or craving for it.

These behaviours are both largely regulated by the neurotransmitter dopamine, a chemical that conveys information in the brain. Once released by one nerve cell it binds to a receptor, a large molecule on the surface of the adjacent nerve cell, thus changing its functioning. A major component in eating-related behaviour is the dopaminergic D2 receptor (DRD2) that is most abundantly localized in striatum, a brain region activated by food anticipation and consumption1.

The function of the dopaminergic system affects eating and weight-related problems in four ways.

First, in some people, the dopamine system reacts more vigorously in response to food.

Second, this response leads to increased eating and possibly obesity.

Third, overeating and obesity lead to less efficient dopaminergic signaling.

Fourth, this lower dopaminergic signal needs to be compensated by more intense behaviour e.g., more eating2.

For example, in people with lower levels of dopamine D2 receptor, cravings for carbohydrate-rich food and junk-food are more prevalent3,4.

Besides eating-related behaviour, dopamine also affects health/obesity via voluntary physical activity, creating a vicious circle: obesity leads to weaker dopaminergic signal, especially lower levels of DRD2 receptor, and this, in turn, leads to decreased exercise and motivation for physical activity5–7.

Furthermore, individuals with lower levels of DRD2 receptors may benefit less from long-term weight loss programs and are less effective in weight maintenance8,9. Thus, dopamine affects body weight via choice of foods, physical activity, and body weight reduction efficacy. Despite the reasons for food-cravings, part of the solution is acknowledging and managing these impulses. Conscious action towards weight-reduction will lead to less pronounced food-cravings, which in turn leads to favourable solution of weight related problems10.

REFERENCES
1. Wise, R.A. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361, 1149–1158 (2006).
2. Alonso-Alonso, M. et al. Nutrition reviews 73, 296–307 (2015).
3. Lek, F.-Y., Ong, H.-H. & Say, Y.-H. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 27, 707–717 (2018).
4. Yeh, J. et al. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 25, 424–429 (2016).
5. Kravitz, A.V., O’Neal, T.J. & Friend, D.M. Front Hum Neurosci 10, 514–514 (2016).
6. Matikainen-Ankney, B.A. & Kravitz, A.V. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1428, 221–239 (2018).
7. Ruegsegger, G.N. & Booth, F.W. Front Endocrinol 8, 109–109 (2017).
8. Roth, C.L., Hinney, A., Schur, E.A., Elfers, C.T. & Reinehr, T. BMC Pediatr 13, 197–197 (2013).
9. Winkler, J.K. et al. Nutrition 28, 996–1001 (2012).
10. Smithson, E.F. & Hill, A.J. Eur J Clin Nutr 71, 625 (2016).

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The food choices we make, how much we exercise and the amount of body fat we have affects our health already at a young age. Although seemingly healthy, our metabolism might tell a different story. This can already be seen at a young age.

The Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (ECPBHS) started 20 years ago in 1998 and has since measured the participants’ body composition and assessed their metabolic abnormalities, such as insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, at ages 15, 18, 25 and 33 years.

Insulin resistance is a state in which the body does not respond to normal levels of insulin efficiently, eventually causing a rise in blood sugar levels. It has been proposed that insulin resistance has a role in the development of several metabolic abnormalities what we know as metabolic syndrome1. These metabolic abnormalities include a large waistline (abdominal obesity), high levels of certain types of fat in the blood called triglycerides, a low level of HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure or usage of blood pressure medication and elevated fasting blood sugar levels or type 2 diabetes diagnosis2.

We have found that already at age 25, individuals who consumed more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol per day and had more than 4 hours of screen time were at higher risk of components of metabolic syndrome3. Insulin resistance was associated with male gender3,4, overweight and obesity, low physical activity levels and the consumption of lipids above the recommended daily energy intake*4. Individuals who consumed carbohydrates below the recommended daily energy intake*, were less likely to be insulin resistant. Already at age 25, insulin resistant individuals had higher serum cholesterol, lower HDL cholesterol, and higher triglyceride levels, fasting blood sugar and insulin levels. People who were overweight also had 4 times higher odds of insulin resistance and being obese increased the odds 12 times if compared to normal weight individuals4. From 15 to 25 years the occurrence of components of metabolic syndrome increased rapidly. At age 15 years 18% of participants had one or more metabolic abnormality and by age 25 years the number had doubled, whereas 5% already had metabolic syndrome.3 Individuals who were insulin resistant were more likely to have metabolic syndrome.4

Insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome are risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life1. As we observed, one fifth of the adolescents already have at least one metabolic abnormality and the number of components of metabolic syndrome increases from adolescence to young adulthood. That is why it is important that healthy lifestyle habits should be introduced and encouraged already in early childhood. Although young people may seem to be healthy, the first signs of developing metabolic abnormalities may already be there.

*According to the Estonian nutrition and physical activity recommendations (2015), the recommended consumption of macronutrients from daily energy intake (E%) is as following: proteins 10–20%, lipids 25–35%, carbohydrates 50–60%5.

Written by:
Urmeli Joost, MSc is a PhD student at the Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Estonia. Her main focus of research is the genetic, environmental and behavioural factors in obesity, dyslipidemia and glucose metabolism.

Inga Villa, MD, PhD is a Lecturer in Health Promotion at the Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Estonia. Her main focus of research is nutrition, physical activity and sociocultural factors on health status and body composition.

REFERENCES
1. Xu, H., Li, X., Adams, H., Kubena, K. & Guo, S. Etiology of Metabolic Syndrome and Dietary Intervention. Int J Mol Sci 20, (2018).

2. Alberti, K. G. M. M. et al. Harmonizing the metabolic syndrome: a joint interim statement of the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; American Heart Association; World Heart Federation; International Atherosclerosis Society; and International Association for the Study of Obesity. Circulation 120, 1640–1645 (2009).

3. Taimur, T. Metaboolse sündroomi komponentide levimus ja seosed toitumisega noorukieast täiskasvanueani. Tartu: Tartu Ülikooli peremeditsiini ja rahvatervishoiu instituut; 2018.

4. Joost U. Insuliinresistentsuse seosed elustiiliharjumustega noortel täiskasvanutel Eestis [masters thesis]. Tartu: Tartu Ülikooli tervishoiu instituut; 2015.

5. Pitsi, et al. Eesti toitumis- ja liikumissoovitused 2015. Tervise Arengu Instituut. Tallinn, 2017.

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Whenever I ask my patients, if they are eating their “5 a day”, the immediate answer is “Yes, sure”. However, sometimes I´m not sure if their “Yes, sure” belongs to their real eating behavior or if it is more like wishful thinking. This question applies for a broad range of behavior, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, having enough sleep, walking the 10.000 steps a day etc.. But how can we be sure what people really do in their everyday life?

The answer is: Ambulatory Assessment

Ambulatory Assessment is the state of the art method for assessing current emotional states, feelings, and behavior in the natural environment of an individual’s everyday life. Equipped with smartphones and accelerometers, it is feasible to track how individuals feel at specific moments, what they are eating across a day and how they physically behave in real time and real life. Electronic e-diaries, provided by an App, prompt individuals whenever an event occur or randomly several times a day. Especially in patient groups with attention deficits, prompting short questionnaires several times a day show better recall than an extensive end-of-day questionnaire.

In the past, food-diaries were based on unhandy and retrospective paper-pencil-questionnaires or computer input. Nowadays, new technological opportunities pave the way to e-food-diaries on smartphones, enabling an immediate and flexible input capability. The design of e-food-diary-apps may be different, i.e., by photos, drop-down-menu, text, or voice records. Important is the documentation of what and how much the participants eat and drink and a database that can be connected to an international or national food code for data analysis.

In the Eat2beNICE research project, we assess food intake every time participants eat or drink by a drop-down-menu that leads from general to very detailed food-items and asks for general meal portions and amounts every time participants eat and drink across the day. If a participant cannot find a particular food-item, he or she has the opportunity to enter a free text message or to record a voice message. If participants forget to enter some foods and drinks across the day, they will receive a reminder in the evening to add forgotten items. This procedure enables very accurate tracking of participant’s food intake in our study.

To sum up, thanks to modern technology we can now accurately measure what a person feels, does and eats throughout the day. Of course, the design of an e-food-diary on the smartphone depends on the projects’- and samples’ requirements. Overall, it has to be easy to use, easy to implement in daily life and to be fun for the participants to obtain a high level of compliance and a high-quality database.

REFERENCES:
Ebner-Priemer, U. W., & Trull, T. J. (2009). Ambulatory Assessment: An Innovative and Promising Approach for Clinical Psychology. European Psychologist, 14, 109–119. https://doi.org/10.1027/1016-9040.14.2.109.

Engel, S. G., Crosby, Ross, Thomas, G., Bond, D., Lavender, J. M., Mason, T., . . . Wonderlich, Stephen. (2016). Ecological Momentary Assessment in Eating Disorder and Obesity Research: a Review of the Recent Literature. Current Psychiatry Reports, 18, 37. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-016-0672-7.

Fuller, N. R., Fong, M., Gerofi, J., Ferkh, F., Leung, C., Leung, L., . . . Caterson, I. D. (2017). Comparison of an electronic versus traditional food diary for assessing dietary intake-A validation study. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 11, 647–654. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2017.04.001.

Smyth, J., Wonderlich, S., Crosby, R., Miltenberger, R., Mitchell, J., & Rorty, M. (2001). The use of ecological momentary assessment approaches in eating disorder research. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 30, 83–95.

Stein, K. F., & Corte, C. M. (2003). Ecologic momentary assessment of eating-disordered behaviors. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 34, 349–360. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.10194.

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Every time I travel and enter the breakfast room of my hotel, I think of Japan.

And not just because of the curious surprises that I encountered when traveling there. (Once, the hotel’s definition of a ‘western style breakfast buffet’ was shrimp pasta and pepperoni pizza!) The Japanese have an interesting relationship with their nutrition. Japanese cuisine is said to have a much higher dietary diversity than western cultures do.

This is associated with a reduced intellectual decline at older age, as was reported by Rei Otsuka and colleagues in 2017 (among others).  In other words, daily intake of various kinds of food lower the risk that you encounter a reduction of your cognitive abilities as you grow older.

Outstanding, even in Japan, is the island of Okinawa, where many people grow very old very healthily. It is not only dietary diversity that contributes to a long and healthy life. The Okinawans have a useful saying: “Hara hachi bu,” which loosely translates to “only fill up to 80%”. Unlike many of us, they don’t snack, but leave their intestines several hours to process the food. And they move a lot – from walking to dancing and martial arts.

Four Easy Rules for Healthy Eating and Lifestyle

So when I approach the buffet, I like picking a little bit of everything – which is fun, contributes to an interesting breakfast conversation, and might even be a smart move for my brain function and mental health!

The real challenge at a buffet, of course, is not to overeat.

Otsuka, R., Nishita, Y., Tange, C., Tomida, M., Kato, Y., Nakamoto, M., Imai, T., Ando, F. & Hiroshi Shimokata, H. Dietary diversity decreases the risk of cognitive decline among Japanese older adults, Geriatr Gerontol Int, 17: 937–944 (2017)  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/ggi.12817

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Assessing someone’s diet can be tricky and particularly time-consuming. People choose from millions of groceries every day, and the vast range of products available adds a further level of complexity to accurately assessing diet. Traditionally, dietary research is based on food diaries, meaning participants keep record of what they eat and drink by writing it down on paper. To extract nutritional information, researchers have to input the paper-based data into nutrient analysis software by hand, which is extremely time-consuming and error-prone. Furthermore, each country has local and distinct food products to offer. These differences need to be considered when assessing nutritional intake in an international project such as New Brain Nutrition.

Faced with these difficulties we are delighted to announce the use of the online 24-h dietary assessment tool “Measure Your Food On One Day (myfood24)” at the University Hospital in Frankfurt for our project. The study aims to investigate the effects of exercise and nutrition on behavioural measures regarding impulsive, compulsive and externalising behaviours.

myfood24 is a quick and easy online dietary assessment tool that tracks, monitors, and analyses dietary intake.

myfood24 is based on a novel approach to assess food intake through technology.

A collaborative project between the University of Leeds (PI Prof Janet Cade) and Imperial College London recognized the need for a valid, reliable, low burden and user-friendly dietary assessment tool. Funded by a UK Medical Research Council grant, the team of experts developed and tested myfood24 for a wide range of age groups including adolescents, adults and older adults and validated myfood24 against a suite of biomarkers.

Participants enter all the foods and drinks they have consumed during one day (from midnight to midnight) into the online tool. They can choose from an extensive range of food items including generic foods (e.g. milk chocolate) and branded products (e.g. milka & daim chocolate). Food portion images are available for a variety of items to help quantify consumed foods. myfood24 is easy to use with no training required; it can also be interviewer-administered. These features help to maximise participation throughout the research project and to cater to a wide range of research project types, study participants and clinical needs.

The academic rigor, automated data processing, and immediate production of results contribute to improved data quality and a drastic time reduction.

myfood24 has 4 country-specific versions available: United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and Australia. These include localised food databases and translations.

A teaching version is also available in the United Kingdom; it has been tailored to a classroom situation and allows for immediate feedback from the whole class to be explored together (without aggregating information elsewhere). Feedback includes a variety of visual and easy-to-interpret graphs at both the individual and group level and includes over 100 different nutrients. myfood24 has wide application in research, teaching and health settings, globally.

Click here to try a free demo of myfood24.

Further information on myfood24 can be found on the myfood24 website.

myfood24 was developed through Medical Research Council funding, grant G110235 by a collaborative project between the University of Leeds (PI Prof Janet Cade) and Imperial College, London. Requests to use myfood24 should be made to enquiries@myfood24.org

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This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 728018

New Brain Nutrition is a project and brand of Eat2BeNice, a consortium of 18 European University Hospitals throughout the continent.

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