How Eating Healthy Can Keep You Mentally Healthy

Dr. Larissa Niemeyer
About the Author

Larissa Niemeyer is a medical doctor and PhD candidate in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim, Germany and her doctoral thesis focuses on reasons for non-adherent behavior in adolescents with psychiatric disorders.


Mens sana in corpore sano – healthy mind and healthy body

Food insecurity – defined as an individual or household lacking access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food that meets individuals’ dietary needs – has been linked to children’s behavioral, academic, and emotional problems and an increased risk of the development of mental health disorders [1,2].

In a Canadian study on food insecurity in young children, researchers found that children from food-insecure families were disproportionately likely to experience persistent symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention. These results were still true after controlling for immigrant status, family structure, maternal age at child’s birth, family income, maternal and paternal education, prenatal tobacco exposure, maternal and paternal depression and negative parenting [3].

Accordingly, a systematic review on food insecurity and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in children reported a predictive and inverse relationship between the two, with possible lasting impacts into adulthood. The authors concluded that evidence exists to hypothesize that childhood food insecurity is associated with predisposing or exacerbating ADHD symptoms in children [4].

In 2017 Dr. Raju, President of the Indian Psychiatric Society concluded in a speech on medical nutrition in mental health and disorders that there is growing evidence for a relationship between quality of diet and mental health. According to Raju, the importance of nutrients as important agents for prevention, treatment, or augmentation of treatment for mental disorders has been established. “Empathic interactions and rational nutrition along with specific pharmacological and physical interventions could form an ideal and humane patient-friendly package in psychiatric practice” [5].

Therefore, identifying families in risk of food insecurity and getting children and adolescents the best possible food supply could result in fewer children with ADHD symptoms.